Tokyo to New York, NY

  • 13 Jan ‘25
  • 136 nights
  • Departing from Tokyo, Japan
  • Silver Dawn
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YOUR ITINERARY

Tokyo, Japan - Osaka, Japan - Osaka, Japan - Hiroshima, Japan - Beppu - Kagoshima - Naha Okinawa - Xiamen - Xiamen - Hong Kong, China - Hong Kong, China - Ha Long Bay, Vietnam - Ha Long Bay, Vietnam - Chan May - Da Nang, Vietnam - Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam - Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam - Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam - Singapore - Singapore - Phuket, Thailand - Phuket, Thailand - Trincomalee, Sri Lanka - Hambantota, Sri Lanka - Colombo, Sri Lanka - Colombo, Sri Lanka - Cochin, India - Mumbai, India - Mumbai, India - Jeddah, Saudi Arabia - Jeddah, Saudi Arabia - Aqaba, Jordan - Safaga, Egypt - Safaga, Egypt - Ain Sukhna - Suez Canal Transit - Ashdod - Haifa, Israel - Rhodes, Greece - Kusadasi, Turkey - Istanbul, Turkey - Istanbul, Turkey - Thessaloniki - Volos, Greece - Nafplion, Greece - Siracusa - Siracusa - Naples, Italy - Naples, Italy - Malaga, Spain - Malaga, Spain - Cadiz, Spain - Cadiz, Spain - Lisbon - Lisbon - Bilbao, Spain - Bordeaux, France - Bordeaux, France - Bordeaux, France - Saint Malo (Brittany) - St. Peter Port, Guernsey - Southampton - Rouen, France - Rouen, France - Rouen, France - Amsterdam - Amsterdam - Hamburg, Germany - Hamburg, Germany - Copenhagen, Denmark - Copenhagen, Denmark - Helsinki, Finland - Tallinn - Tallinn - Stockholm, Sweden - Stockholm, Sweden - Longyearbyen/Oslo, Norway - Longyearbyen/Oslo, Norway - Bergen, Norway - Torshavn - Akureyri, Iceland - Isafjordur, Iceland - Reykjavik, Iceland - Reykjavik, Iceland - Qaqortoq - Nuuk - Nuuk - St John's, Newfoundland, Canada - St John's, Newfoundland, Canada - Halifax - Boston, Massachusetts - Boston, Massachusetts - New York City

Date
Port
Info
Arrive
Depart
Day 1
13th Jan 2025
Tokyo, Japan

Dense and delightful, there’s nowhere else like ...

Dense and delightful, there’s nowhere else like Japan’s kinetic capital – a city where ancient traditions blend seamlessly with a relentless pursuit for the future’s sharpest edge. See the city from above, as elevators rocket you up to towering viewing platforms, from which you can survey a vast urban ocean, interspersed with sky-scraping needles. Look out as far as the distant loom of Mount Fuji’s cone on clear days. View less

Futuristic – second-accurate – transport seamlessly links Tokyo’s 14 districts, while the glow of flashing advertisement boards, clanks of arcade machines, and waves of humanity flowing along its streets, adds to the sense of mesmerising, dizzying and glorious sensory overload. One of Tokyo’s most iconic sights, don’t miss the flood of people scrambling to cross Shibuya’s famous intersection. Join the choreographed dance, as crowds of briefcase-carrying commuters are given the green light to cross at the same time – bathed in the light of massive neon advertisements. The culture is immensely rich and deep, with 7th-century, lantern-decorated temples, stunning palaces and tranquil scarlet shrines waiting below cloaks of incense and nestling between soaring skyscrapers. Restaurants serve up precisely prepared sushi, and wafer-thin seafood slivers, offering a unique taste of the country’s refined cuisine. Settle into traditional teahouses, to witness intricate ceremonies, or join the locals as they fill out karaoke bars to sing the night away. In the spring, cherry blossom paints a delicate pink sheen over the city’s innumerable parks and gardens.

Arrive
Depart
23:00
Day 3
15th Jan 2025
Osaka, Japan

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shac...

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. View less

Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours. Osaka Castle is another of the city’s landmarks, built in the 16th century by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. A modern museum now waits inside, where you can learn about the country’s history, and why this castle is a symbol of Japanese unity. Be sure to take the elevator up to the observation deck for a panoramic view of Osaka’s spread. A colourful park encloses the castle and blooms with an ocean of pale pink cherry blossom during the season – the elegant black tiers rising from the pink haze below is one of Osaka’s most alluring visions. Kyoto’s peaceful cultural treasures and temples are also just a short jaunt away on Japan’s sleek trains, should you wish to explore further afield.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 4
16th Jan 2025
Osaka, Japan

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its s...

Japan’s third-biggest city has thrown off its shackles and stepped out of the shadows to light up the sky with glaring neon signs and a larger than life outlook. Giant octopuses cling to buildings and bustling restaurants pack in the crowds in this great and garish place, which is Japan at its most friendly, extroverted and flavourful. So dive in headfirst to experience an all-out sensory assault of delicious food, shopping cathedrals and glittering temples. View less

Dotombori Bridge bathes in the multicoloured, jewel-like lights of signage-plastered buildings, and the neon lights dance on the canal’s waters below. Osaka is known as the nation’s kitchen, and the Kuromon Ichiba Market has served as the city’s spot to tuck in for almost 200 years. Full of street food stalls – try pufferfish, savoury Okonomiyaki pancakes, or ginger and onion flavoured octopus, among the endless feast of exotic flavours. Osaka Castle is another of the city’s landmarks, built in the 16th century by Toyotomi Hideyoshi. A modern museum now waits inside, where you can learn about the country’s history, and why this castle is a symbol of Japanese unity. Be sure to take the elevator up to the observation deck for a panoramic view of Osaka’s spread. A colourful park encloses the castle and blooms with an ocean of pale pink cherry blossom during the season – the elegant black tiers rising from the pink haze below is one of Osaka’s most alluring visions. Kyoto’s peaceful cultural treasures and temples are also just a short jaunt away on Japan’s sleek trains, should you wish to explore further afield.

Arrive
Depart
23:00
Day 6
18th Jan 2025
Hiroshima, Japan

History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite be...

History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. View less

The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed. There are many other inspiring messages of hope around the city too; the Children’s’ Peace Monument just north of the park is a homage to little Sadako Sasaki, who was just two in 1945. When she developed leukemia in 1956, she believed that if she folded 1,000 paper cranes – a symbol of longevity and happiness in Japan – she would recover. Sadly she died before she finished her task but her classmates finished the rest. If you are lucky enough to visit during the unpredictable and short-lived Sakura (cherry blossom) season, then the extraordinary sight of the delicate pink blossom floating across the water to the red gate, means you can consider yourself one of the luckiest people on the planet.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 7
19th Jan 2025
Beppu

The lantern-lit hot springs of Beppu, known for its...

The lantern-lit hot springs of Beppu, known for its eight scorching “Hells”, is a town that’s prettier than a picture. The town is found in a particularly volcanically active part of Japan (hence the abundance of hot springs, or in Japanese, onsens). The viewing pools have evocative names; think Sea Hell, Blood Pond Hell and Tornado Hell. While the names might seem a little off putting, the reality is stunning; sulphur laced air and vast spectrums of blues and reds, depending on the mineralisation of the earth.

As if the gorgeous palette of colours at the onsen was not enough, Beppu is also world famous for its Sakura, or cherry blossom season. More than 2,000 cherry trees near the base of the ropeway to Mount Tsurumi make for one of Beppu’s most impressive hanami (flower viewing) spots. If not lucky enough to be in the area during Sakura, from May to June rhododendrons colour the mountain. The view from this 1,375m mountain is beyond impressive, allowing you to see all the way to the Kuju Mountains, Chugoku and Shikoku. If brave enough to climb all the way to the top, the stone Buddhas that were carved into the mountainside during the Heian Period (794-1185) are a worthy reward! As with much of Japan, duality is ever present. Modernity sits very comfortably by ancient buildings. While Beppu’s biggest pull is by far the hot springs and the thermal baths, nearby (10 km) Yufuin has a wealth of art museums, cafes and boutiques, catering to trend setters and urbanites alike.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
16:00
Day 8
20th Jan 2025
Kagoshima

One of Japan’s most southerly major cities, Kagoshi...

One of Japan’s most southerly major cities, Kagoshima is dominated by the imposing Sakurajima volcano’s cone – a legendary active volcano that broods, churns and puffs out ash nearby. A pretty old-time ferry chugs across the still waters to the gently sloping foothills of the volcano’s cone, and it’s easy to imagine where the comparisons with its sister city Naples materialised, as you sail the glorious sweeping Kinko Bay, below beaming sunshine, towards the immense volcanic spectacle. View less

This is certainly no historic relic, and the volcano remains revered and feared, with the most dramatic recent eruption taking place in 1914, and spewing out a new bridge of land into the sea. Make the most of the geothermal activity in the area by indulging in a stress-simmering black sand bath. Incredibly relaxing, you’ll be submerged in the warm sand, as you feel your muscles relaxing in the heat, and rejuvenating blood pumping around your body. Enjoy a privileged view of the iconic volcano’s loom from the terraced garden of Senganen Garden. Built in 1658, this elegant, traditional garden has belonged to the Shimadzu family for 350 years. Wander the gardens – which bloom with Japan’s renowned cherry tree blossoms and feature tiny bridges looping over ponds and rock pools – before sitting back and sipping a wholesome green matcha latte. Elsewhere, museums offer Feudal Era and Satsuma Province history, as well as insights into the Kamikaze squadrons of World War II. Lake Ikeda is also close by, so be sure to keep an eye out for the legendary Issie monster.

Arrive
09:00
Depart
23:00
Day 10
22nd Jan 2025
Naha Okinawa
Arrive
08:00
Depart
16:00
Day 12
24th Jan 2025
Xiamen

Once known to the West as Amoy, Xiamen is a small offshore...

Once known to the West as Amoy, Xiamen is a small offshore island now linked to the mainland by a causeway. The town dates from the Ming dynasty, and has been of significance in coastal trade ever since. A thriving port in the 17th century, it was influenced by a steady stream of Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch fortune hunters. When invading Manchu armies poured down from the north to drive out the Ming, Xiamen became a center of resistance, led by the pirate and self styled Prince Koxinga. A couple hundred years later the British arrived, increasing trade and establishing themselves on the nearby island of Gulangyu. Their dominance was formalized with the Treaty of Nanjing in 1842. Prosperity was maintained until the Japanese invasion at the beginning of WWII.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 13
25th Jan 2025
Xiamen

Once known to the West as Amoy, Xiamen is a small offshore i...

Once known to the West as Amoy, Xiamen is a small offshore island now linked to the mainland by a causeway. The town dates from the Ming dynasty, and has been of significance in coastal trade ever since. A thriving port in the 17th century, it was influenced by a steady stream of Portuguese, Spanish and Dutch fortune hunters. When invading Manchu armies poured down from the north to drive out the Ming, Xiamen became a center of resistance, led by the pirate and self styled Prince Koxinga. A couple hundred years later the British arrived, increasing trade and establishing themselves on the nearby island of Gulangyu. Their dominance was formalized with the Treaty of Nanjing in 1842. Prosperity was maintained until the Japanese invasion at the beginning of WWII.

Arrive
Depart
13:00
Day 14
26th Jan 2025
Hong Kong, China

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and ne...

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. View less

Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Arrive
09:00
Depart
Day 15
27th Jan 2025
Hong Kong, China

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and ...

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. View less

Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Arrive
Depart
21:00
Day 17
29th Jan 2025
Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

The extraordinary, mossy limestone mountains that rear from the ...

The extraordinary, mossy limestone mountains that rear from the waters of Ha Long Bay form one of the most spectacular natural landscapes on the planet. At least 1,600 green islands rise over a flotilla of strung-together fishing boats and floating villages. Spectacular at any time, sunset bathes the remarkable limestone formations in warm, honey-coloured light, adding an extra layer to the seascape’s heart-stirring beauty. Emerald green sea washes around this immense network of islands and limestone outcrops, which you can explore at leisure on junk boats and by sea kayak. View less

Local legend says the islands were formed when a dragon descended, spitting fire and emerald and jade jewels across the water to deter invaders. The sheer scale points to the supernatural – but scientists stubbornly maintain that this collection of towering sculptures was the result of various forms of erosion and a flood of seawater following the ice age. The water continues to chip away at the islands, and you can venture into the mouths of caves hollowed out by the relentless wash of the waves. Dau Go Cave and Sung Sot Caves are adorned with rows of spectacular stalactites, descending like dragon teeth from above. Investigate via boat, and find island jewels like Ti Top – a sharp, slope of land decorated with a crisp fringe of gleaming sand. The seaplanes that soar overhead, offer a magnificent bird’s eye perspective. Located in Vietnam’s northeast, the unique topography that forms the islands continues into neighbouring national parks like Cat Ba – which rises and falls in a similar, jaggedly undulating fashion, just without the flooded seawater in-between.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 18
30th Jan 2025
Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

The extraordinary, mossy limestone mountains that re...

The extraordinary, mossy limestone mountains that rear from the waters of Ha Long Bay form one of the most spectacular natural landscapes on the planet. At least 1,600 green islands rise over a flotilla of strung-together fishing boats and floating villages. Spectacular at any time, sunset bathes the remarkable limestone formations in warm, honey-coloured light, adding an extra layer to the seascape’s heart-stirring beauty. Emerald green sea washes around this immense network of islands and limestone outcrops, which you can explore at leisure on junk boats and by sea kayak. View less

Local legend says the islands were formed when a dragon descended, spitting fire and emerald and jade jewels across the water to deter invaders. The sheer scale points to the supernatural – but scientists stubbornly maintain that this collection of towering sculptures was the result of various forms of erosion and a flood of seawater following the ice age. The water continues to chip away at the islands, and you can venture into the mouths of caves hollowed out by the relentless wash of the waves. Dau Go Cave and Sung Sot Caves are adorned with rows of spectacular stalactites, descending like dragon teeth from above. Investigate via boat, and find island jewels like Ti Top – a sharp, slope of land decorated with a crisp fringe of gleaming sand. The seaplanes that soar overhead, offer a magnificent bird’s eye perspective. Located in Vietnam’s northeast, the unique topography that forms the islands continues into neighbouring national parks like Cat Ba – which rises and falls in a similar, jaggedly undulating fashion, just without the flooded seawater in-between.

Arrive
Depart
13:00
Day 19
31st Jan 2025
Chan May

Experience the rich imperial past, stoic resilience, and blissf...

Experience the rich imperial past, stoic resilience, and blissful beaches of central Vietnam, as you delve deep into this fascinating country’s past and present. The sheer beauty and vitality of the scenery will amaze you, as you explore the stories this now tranquil land has to tell – all the while surrounded by rolling rice paddies, freely grazing water buffalo and soaring limestone scenery. Cut in half by the evocatively named Perfume River, and home to a spectacular sprawling citadel, Hue is a true experience for the senses.

Vietnam’s timeless beauty outshines the shadows of its past, but Hue still bears the heavy scars of war – whether it’s from American bombs, or harrowing events like those of Hue Jungle Crevice – where the Viet Cong pushed 3,000 civilians to their deaths. Hue’s Old City was once the jewel of Vietnam, standing proudly as its Imperial Capital. Lotus flowers now twirl peacefully in the grand moat around its mighty walls, which encase a spectacular array of charred palaces, temples and regal residences. Danang’s Marble Mountains rise dramatically close by, and they are scattered with Buddhist shrines and plunging caves. While there is an endless treasure trove of rich cultural experiences waiting here, it’s hard to resist the call of Danang’s idyllic beaches, where white sand gives way to a fringe of palm trees. The undulating humps of the city’s Dragon Bridge soar across the wide River Han, and this ambitious structure comes alive at night, when strobing light shows illuminate its flowing form, and the bridge’s dragon head rasps fire into the dusk.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:59
Day 20
1st Feb 2025
Da Nang, Vietnam

Halfway between Ho Chi Minh City and Hoi An, Da Nan...

Halfway between Ho Chi Minh City and Hoi An, Da Nang often gets overlooked on the traveller trail. However, as the third largest city in Vietnam (with a population of 1 million), Da Nang packs a punch that other puts other Vietnamese cities in the shade. Naturally, Da Nang is a savvy choice. The beaches are simply stunning – white sand that runs on for miles, lapped by sapphire seas and punctuated by tall coconut trees.

The mountains are stunning – vast swathes of emerald green poking out of the top of the few skyscrapers the city has. And the temples are vast and plentiful. From Lady Buddha – an 18th century shrine and statue that guards over the fishermen – to the Marble Mountains, Da Nang is a sublime mixture of secret lagoons, spiritual sites and Vietnamese energy. The aforementioned Marble Mountains are undeniably the city’s main attraction, although the Golden Hands Bridge (40 kilometres from the city centre) is fast overtaking the Mountains for top spot. Both are sublime in their beauty – one a spiritual pilgrimage site sculpted by (and named after) the elements, the other, a man-made structure of two giant concrete hands that stretch towards the sky. Add to that the busy markets selling everything from Vietnamese silk to street food and the My Son temple ruins (Vietnam’s answer to Angkor Wat) and you have a destination that offers travellers far more than tourist trinkets. If you are looking for a Vietnamese city that offers both connection and authenticity, you have found it in Da Nang.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:59
Day 22
3rd Feb 2025
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation ...

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho Chi Minh City is a place of incense-infused temples, colonial architecture, warm people and delicious street food. Formerly known as Saigon, the city was affectionately-labelled the Pearl of the Orient by the French. Afternoons here drift by lazily on the gentle chaos of the River Saigon, as taxi boats and motor canoes flit up and down, and parks fill out with locals playing jianzi, kicking shuttlecocks back and forth. View less

The French colonial imprint is evidenced in the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica, which stands out with its grand double bell towers and red brick hue. Just across the road, you’ll also find the celebrated Ho Chi Minh Post office, which was erroneously credited as a Gustav Eifel creation. In reality, the architect was another Frenchman, Alfred Foulhoux. The French also caffeinated this city with coffee culture, and a refreshing iced coffee, from the innumerable coffee shops, will perk you up instantly. Taste the street food to get under Ho Chi Minh City’s skin, with humble restaurants serving up rich flavours – from the Vietnamese take on the baguette, a banh mi sandwich – to the local staple of pho, a delicious noodle soup. The Tortoise pagoda is a tranquil escape and a serene place of worship for Vietnamese who practice Buddhism and Taoism, while the Vietnamese medical museum has a fascinating collection of remedies and potions – some dating back to Stone Age. Journey out to learn more of the Vietnam War at the Remnants Museum and Cu Chi tunnels. Offering a vivid glimpse of conditions, and the ingenuity and resilience of the soldiers, you’ll learn of the guerrilla war campaign raged from within this claustrophobic, 70-mile network of war tunnels.

Arrive
12:00
Depart
Day 23
4th Feb 2025
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation ̵...

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho Chi Minh City is a place of incense-infused temples, colonial architecture, warm people and delicious street food. Formerly known as Saigon, the city was affectionately-labelled the Pearl of the Orient by the French. Afternoons here drift by lazily on the gentle chaos of the River Saigon, as taxi boats and motor canoes flit up and down, and parks fill out with locals playing jianzi, kicking shuttlecocks back and forth. View less

The French colonial imprint is evidenced in the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica, which stands out with its grand double bell towers and red brick hue. Just across the road, you’ll also find the celebrated Ho Chi Minh Post office, which was erroneously credited as a Gustav Eifel creation. In reality, the architect was another Frenchman, Alfred Foulhoux. The French also caffeinated this city with coffee culture, and a refreshing iced coffee, from the innumerable coffee shops, will perk you up instantly. Taste the street food to get under Ho Chi Minh City’s skin, with humble restaurants serving up rich flavours – from the Vietnamese take on the baguette, a banh mi sandwich – to the local staple of pho, a delicious noodle soup. The Tortoise pagoda is a tranquil escape and a serene place of worship for Vietnamese who practice Buddhism and Taoism, while the Vietnamese medical museum has a fascinating collection of remedies and potions – some dating back to Stone Age. Journey out to learn more of the Vietnam War at the Remnants Museum and Cu Chi tunnels. Offering a vivid glimpse of conditions, and the ingenuity and resilience of the soldiers, you’ll learn of the guerrilla war campaign raged from within this claustrophobic, 70-mile network of war tunnels.

Arrive
Depart
Day 24
5th Feb 2025
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho C...

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho Chi Minh City is a place of incense-infused temples, colonial architecture, warm people and delicious street food. Formerly known as Saigon, the city was affectionately-labelled the Pearl of the Orient by the French. Afternoons here drift by lazily on the gentle chaos of the River Saigon, as taxi boats and motor canoes flit up and down, and parks fill out with locals playing jianzi, kicking shuttlecocks back and forth. View less

The French colonial imprint is evidenced in the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica, which stands out with its grand double bell towers and red brick hue. Just across the road, you’ll also find the celebrated Ho Chi Minh Post office, which was erroneously credited as a Gustav Eifel creation. In reality, the architect was another Frenchman, Alfred Foulhoux. The French also caffeinated this city with coffee culture, and a refreshing iced coffee, from the innumerable coffee shops, will perk you up instantly. Taste the street food to get under Ho Chi Minh City’s skin, with humble restaurants serving up rich flavours – from the Vietnamese take on the baguette, a banh mi sandwich – to the local staple of pho, a delicious noodle soup. The Tortoise pagoda is a tranquil escape and a serene place of worship for Vietnamese who practice Buddhism and Taoism, while the Vietnamese medical museum has a fascinating collection of remedies and potions – some dating back to Stone Age. Journey out to learn more of the Vietnam War at the Remnants Museum and Cu Chi tunnels. Offering a vivid glimpse of conditions, and the ingenuity and resilience of the soldiers, you’ll learn of the guerrilla war campaign raged from within this claustrophobic, 70-mile network of war tunnels.

Arrive
Depart
13:00
Day 26
7th Feb 2025
Singapore

Advanced, airy and elevated, Singapore is a specta...

Advanced, airy and elevated, Singapore is a spectacular, futuristic vision of utopian city life. A healthy population of almost six million call it home, but this is a city designed with space to breathe, and gorgeous outdoor parks, massive indoor greenhouses and beautiful recreational spaces spread between the City of Gardens’ skyscrapers and soaring structures. Once a quiet fishing village, now a glistening island city-state and an international beacon of science, education and technology. View less

Singapore is almost intimidatingly clean – and the hyper-efficient public transport system whips residents and visitors across the city’s neighbourhoods in a heartbeat. Glorious fountains and audacious skyscrapers loom up – nodding to traditional feng shui beliefs – and putting on dazzling illuminated displays after dark. The lush green botanical gardens are a spectacular UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering 52 hectares and decorated with impressive colourful orchids. Or breathe in more of the freshest air by heading up to wander the canopy strung bridges of MacRitchie Reservoir Park. Head for the iconic Marina Bay – a landmark of the city crowned by three interconnected towers, which watch out over island sprinkled waters. Jaunt between Little India and the atmospheric Chinatown in minutes, where beautiful temples – like the Chinese Thian Hock Keng Temple and Hindu Sri Mariamman Temple add rich cultural intrigue. Singapore’s cuisine is a mouthwatering fusion of its Indian, Chinese, Indonesian, and Malay influences, taking and enhancing the best of each. Enjoy dishes in towering restaurants, or toast the glowing skyline with the city’s eponymous gin-soaked cocktail – a Singapore Sling.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
Day 27
8th Feb 2025
Singapore

Advanced, airy and elevated, Singapore is a spectacu...

Advanced, airy and elevated, Singapore is a spectacular, futuristic vision of utopian city life. A healthy population of almost six million call it home, but this is a city designed with space to breathe, and gorgeous outdoor parks, massive indoor greenhouses and beautiful recreational spaces spread between the City of Gardens’ skyscrapers and soaring structures. Once a quiet fishing village, now a glistening island city-state and an international beacon of science, education and technology. View less

Singapore is almost intimidatingly clean – and the hyper-efficient public transport system whips residents and visitors across the city’s neighbourhoods in a heartbeat. Glorious fountains and audacious skyscrapers loom up – nodding to traditional feng shui beliefs – and putting on dazzling illuminated displays after dark. The lush green botanical gardens are a spectacular UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering 52 hectares and decorated with impressive colourful orchids. Or breathe in more of the freshest air by heading up to wander the canopy strung bridges of MacRitchie Reservoir Park. Head for the iconic Marina Bay – a landmark of the city crowned by three interconnected towers, which watch out over island sprinkled waters. Jaunt between Little India and the atmospheric Chinatown in minutes, where beautiful temples – like the Chinese Thian Hock Keng Temple and Hindu Sri Mariamman Temple add rich cultural intrigue. Singapore’s cuisine is a mouthwatering fusion of its Indian, Chinese, Indonesian, and Malay influences, taking and enhancing the best of each. Enjoy dishes in towering restaurants, or toast the glowing skyline with the city’s eponymous gin-soaked cocktail – a Singapore Sling.

Arrive
Depart
23:00
Day 29
10th Feb 2025
Phuket, Thailand

Thailand’s only island province is connecte...

Thailand’s only island province is connected to the mainland by the Thep Krasettree Causeway. Known as the “Pearl of Thailand,” Phuket offers pristine beaches, lush vegetation, traditional villages and seascapes of huge limestone pillars that rise above the turquoise waters of Phang Nga Bay. With a land area of 215 square miles, Phuket Island is Thailand’s largest island and about the same size as Singapore. Arab and Indian navigators have called here since the end of the 9th century, while the first Europeans arrived in the 16th century.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 30
11th Feb 2025
Phuket, Thailand

Thailand’s only island province is connected to the mainl...

Thailand’s only island province is connected to the mainland by the Thep Krasettree Causeway. Known as the “Pearl of Thailand,” Phuket offers pristine beaches, lush vegetation, traditional villages and seascapes of huge limestone pillars that rise above the turquoise waters of Phang Nga Bay. With a land area of 215 square miles, Phuket Island is Thailand’s largest island and about the same size as Singapore. Arab and Indian navigators have called here since the end of the 9th century, while the first Europeans arrived in the 16th century.

Arrive
Depart
19:00
Day 34
15th Feb 2025
Trincomalee, Sri Lanka

Built on a truly majestic natural harbour – one of the ...

Built on a truly majestic natural harbour – one of the world’s largest – Trincomalee is a gateway to the deep historical interests of Sri Lanka. Richly cultural and historic, Trincomalee is surrounded by treasured sites, which hark back thousands of years – and hold unprecedented cultural value. Set on the eastern coast of Sri Lanka – on the peninsula that it shares its name with – venture inland to explore some of the world’s most majestic and evocative archaeological and holy sites. View less

Or, take it easy and lay back on Trincomalee’s plentiful, palm-lined beaches. Boat tours can take you out to cruise among dolphins and whales, or to the reefs of Pigeon Island. A swirl of colonial houses, temples and mosques line the multi-cultural streets of this fascinating destination. Live like a local and start the day with a steaming cup of Ceylon tea and buffalo curd for breakfast before heading out to visit extraordinary sites of ancient worship, as you explore Sri Lanka’s incredible UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Head inland to the jaw-dropping Golden Temple of Dambulla, a vast temple, dominated by a gleaming gold Buddha figure. The amazing Ancient City of Polonnaruwa dates back to the 12th century and is an unearthed treasure trove of ruins – famous for its meticulously thought out urban planning. Polonnaruwa was the second capital of Sri Lanka, and you can visit the first capital at the Sacred City of Anuradhapura – a place of immense value to the Buddhist faith. The Sirigiya Rock Fortress is a jaw-dropping collaboration between man and nature, and the incredible fortress sits perched above an almighty 200-metre high slab of rock.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
23:00
Day 36
17th Feb 2025
Hambantota, Sri Lanka

Far to the south of Sri Lanka is the city of Hambantota with...

Far to the south of Sri Lanka is the city of Hambantota with a colorful and storied traditional Ruhuna past and great promise for the future. This gateway to Sri Lanka is rich in resources and since being upset by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, has put great emphasis on rebuilding and moving progressively into a central role in the development of the southern region of Sri Lanka. Traditionally an agricultural area, the region is also known for having some of the country’s most skilled jewelers and crafts people.

Arrive
04:00
Depart
19:00
Day 37
18th Feb 2025
Colombo, Sri Lanka

Perfumed flower garlands, colonial roots, and lavish afternoon...

Perfumed flower garlands, colonial roots, and lavish afternoon teas welcome you to the former garden city of Colombo. Sri Lanka’s easy breezy city is certainly intoxicating, with its cinnamon dusted air, steaming cups of delicate ceylon, and sassy seaside charm. A place of full sensory immersion, explore tangled streets to sidestep frantic tuk-tuks and gaze in awe at grand colonial buildings turned heritage hotels. Cute cafes usher you inside for sweet lassi, and the walls are made for a pleasantly laxidasical pace of walking.

They’re perhaps most impressive on stormy days, when you can watch bruised clouds tumble and roil across the sea from this perfect vantage point. Back in the capital, stroll the ornate halls of the National Museum where gilded swords, studded masks, and rare artefacts from the ancient world and colonial times are gathered. Visit the Gangaramaya Temple, to walk among the orange-robed monks who glide between flora-strewn alters, or plunge into the chaos of Pettah – where market cries reach orchestral heights. An incredible gathering of carved Hindu gods decorate the colourful pyramid of the Captain’s Garden Kovil temple – the oldest Hindu temple in the city, which rises majestically from the surrounding railway tracks. Forever the dish of the day, crab is a must in Colombo. Sit down, tuck in your bib and use your hands to crack, scoop and suck out the soft white meat – especially delicious when smothered in lashings of garlic and fiery chilli.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 38
19th Feb 2025
Colombo, Sri Lanka

Perfumed flower garlands, colonial roots, and lavish aftern...

Perfumed flower garlands, colonial roots, and lavish afternoon teas welcome you to the former garden city of Colombo. Sri Lanka’s easy breezy city is certainly intoxicating, with its cinnamon dusted air, steaming cups of delicate ceylon, and sassy seaside charm. A place of full sensory immersion, explore tangled streets to sidestep frantic tuk-tuks and gaze in awe at grand colonial buildings turned heritage hotels. Cute cafes usher you inside for sweet lassi, and the walls are made for a pleasantly laxidasical pace of walking.

They’re perhaps most impressive on stormy days, when you can watch bruised clouds tumble and roil across the sea from this perfect vantage point. Back in the capital, stroll the ornate halls of the National Museum where gilded swords, studded masks, and rare artefacts from the ancient world and colonial times are gathered. Visit the Gangaramaya Temple, to walk among the orange-robed monks who glide between flora-strewn alters, or plunge into the chaos of Pettah – where market cries reach orchestral heights. An incredible gathering of carved Hindu gods decorate the colourful pyramid of the Captain’s Garden Kovil temple – the oldest Hindu temple in the city, which rises majestically from the surrounding railway tracks. Forever the dish of the day, crab is a must in Colombo. Sit down, tuck in your bib and use your hands to crack, scoop and suck out the soft white meat – especially delicious when smothered in lashings of garlic and fiery chilli.

Arrive
Depart
19:00
Day 40
21st Feb 2025
Cochin, India

A hodgepodge of cultures collide on the banks of the est...

A hodgepodge of cultures collide on the banks of the estuary where Cochin carves out her home. Chinese fishing nets the size of skyscrapers, boxy Dutch architecture and pretty Portuguese palaces point to the blend of influence here, while the Raj era remnants, soaring spires of old-world mosques, and near-abandoned synagogues all add to the dense, varied tapestry of inspirations and imprints.

Founded by a prince in the 15th century, Cochin immediately became a favoured anchorage for sailors and traders from every far-flung corner – even taking nearby Kerala’s crown as the world’s first global port city. Now, fragrant spice markets cut the hot air with cardamom and clove, while antique stores groan beneath the weight of singing copper. Hit the backstreets of Fort Kochi for a deep and dreamy Ayurvedic massage, marvel at the Krishna murals that adorn the bedchamber walls of the Mattancherry Palace, or admire India’s one of the oldest European-built Christian churches – as you duck into the cool hues of St Francis. A day can easily meander past on a backwater cruise, spreading south from Cochin, and gliding down a lacy network of creeks, lagoons, lakes and rivers. Surrounded by swaying palms and rice paddies – you’ll experience rural India in her best dress. When daylight dwindles, taste the soft spicy kick of dal roti, followed by Firni – almonds, apricots, and sweet milk crushed with pastel green pistachios for a silky light finish.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 42
23rd Feb 2025
Mumbai, India

Mumbai, or Bombay as it is more commonly known, is India’...

Mumbai, or Bombay as it is more commonly known, is India’s business capital. In the 500 years since its “discovery” by the Portuguese, Mumbai has been transformed from an aboriginal fishing village into a sprawling metropolis of some 14 million people. It is the money capital of India, a magnet for entrepreneurs, the home of India’s stock exchange, and headquarters for many national and international companies.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 43
24th Feb 2025
Mumbai, India

Mumbai, or Bombay as it is more commonly known, is India’...

Mumbai, or Bombay as it is more commonly known, is India’s business capital. In the 500 years since its “discovery” by the Portuguese, Mumbai has been transformed from an aboriginal fishing village into a sprawling metropolis of some 14 million people. It is the money capital of India, a magnet for entrepreneurs, the home of India’s stock exchange, and headquarters for many national and international companies.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 49
2nd Mar 2025
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

The most cosmopolitan city in Saudi Arabia, Jeddah (Jiddah) i...

The most cosmopolitan city in Saudi Arabia, Jeddah (Jiddah) is the “gem” of the Red Sea, and second in size only to the capital city of Riyadh. Located mid-way along the coast of the Kingdom, Jeddah it is the busiest of all the Kingdom’s ports. In addition to being the country’s principle port, Jeddah is the main point of entry into Saudi Arabia for the hundreds of thousands of Muslim pilgrims on their way to the Holy Cities of Makkah (Mecca) and Madinah. Saudi Arabia is known as the birthplace of Muhammed and contains the holiest cities of Islam. Jeddah is, surprisingly, named in honor of the biblical Eve. “Jadda” means “grandmother” in the context of Eve, who according to legend is buried near the historical old city.
The Old City of Jeddah, known as Al-Balad, with its serpentine alleys, is marked with the centuries old multi-storied buildings. The lower portions of the walls tend to be made from cut stone bricks, while the upper sections are constructed from mud bricks with latticed wooden poles. The heart of Old Jeddah is its markets. In its centre is the 700 year old flag mast and 15th century cannon, which dominate the King Abdul Aziz Historical Square.

Arrive
09:00
Depart
Day 50
3rd Mar 2025
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

The most cosmopolitan city in Saudi Arabia, Jeddah (...

The most cosmopolitan city in Saudi Arabia, Jeddah (Jiddah) is the “gem” of the Red Sea, and second in size only to the capital city of Riyadh. Located mid-way along the coast of the Kingdom, Jeddah it is the busiest of all the Kingdom’s ports. In addition to being the country’s principle port, Jeddah is the main point of entry into Saudi Arabia for the hundreds of thousands of Muslim pilgrims on their way to the Holy Cities of Makkah (Mecca) and Madinah. Saudi Arabia is known as the birthplace of Muhammed and contains the holiest cities of Islam. Jeddah is, surprisingly, named in honor of the biblical Eve. “Jadda” means “grandmother” in the context of Eve, who according to legend is buried near the historical old city.
The Old City of Jeddah, known as Al-Balad, with its serpentine alleys, is marked with the centuries old multi-storied buildings. The lower portions of the walls tend to be made from cut stone bricks, while the upper sections are constructed from mud bricks with latticed wooden poles. The heart of Old Jeddah is its markets. In its centre is the 700 year old flag mast and 15th century cannon, which dominate the King Abdul Aziz Historical Square.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 52
5th Mar 2025
Aqaba, Jordan

Improbably carved into the rusty-red rock of the Jordanian...

Improbably carved into the rusty-red rock of the Jordanian desert, the ancient city of Petra has been mesmerising visitors since being rediscovered by Westerners in 1812. Siq Canyon provides a suitably grandiose welcome, cutting a deep track through layers of fiery sandstone, and building up the suspense, before you first set eyes on the Lost City’s majesty. An early start is best to explore this UNESCO World Heritage Site, giving you chance to beat the crowds and avoid the brunt of the heat.

The Treasury is perhaps Petra’s best-known structure, having featured in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade as the mystical hiding place of the Holy Grail. Imprinted deep into the sheer sandstone, it’s a dramatic, spectacular achievement of human endeavour. Look closely, and you’ll see the indentations of bullet holes scarring the urn that sits atop it – fired by Bedouins fuelled by rumours of ancient treasure within. Petra developed as the capital of the Nabataean Kingdom, and the sophistication of the Rose Kingdom’s rock-hewn buildings is matched only by the elaborate and advanced water collection and transportation system that quenched its thirst and provided the means to thrive, despite its remote location and the intense burn of the sun. Look out for the delicate water channels that lace the city as you explore. High above the city – up a daunting 800-step climb – stands the Monastery. It’s lesser known, but larger and – whisper it quietly – perhaps even more impressive than the Treasury. The High Place of Sacrifice is an even tougher hike – with only occasional electric-blue lizards scattering from your footsteps as you rise – but the views of the remarkable city, embossed into the mighty sandstone cliffs below, will last a lifetime.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 53
6th Mar 2025
Safaga, Egypt

The port city of Safaga is located on the western flank of ...

The port city of Safaga is located on the western flank of the Red Sea, across from the shores of Saudi Arabia. The dusty streets are for the most part quiet, save for the occasional truck or bus. Diving enthusiasts come to the few resort hotels located north of Safaga to enjoy one of the world’s best and relatively unspoiled locations for underwater exploration. Their number is steadily increasing. As a result, Safaga’s facilities are gradually improving.
For cruise vessels calling here, Safaga serves as the gateway to Luxor, which ranks among the most important destinations in Egypt, topping the list of must-see attractions. Guests who are not planning to take the excursion to Luxor will find very limited activities in Safaga itself, except for souvenir shopping at some tourist villages and diving and snorkeling tours at resort hotels. A half day trip to the resort of Hurghada is also an option.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
Day 54
7th Mar 2025
Safaga, Egypt

The port city of Safaga is located on the western flan...

The port city of Safaga is located on the western flank of the Red Sea, across from the shores of Saudi Arabia. The dusty streets are for the most part quiet, save for the occasional truck or bus. Diving enthusiasts come to the few resort hotels located north of Safaga to enjoy one of the world’s best and relatively unspoiled locations for underwater exploration. Their number is steadily increasing. As a result, Safaga’s facilities are gradually improving.
For cruise vessels calling here, Safaga serves as the gateway to Luxor, which ranks among the most important destinations in Egypt, topping the list of must-see attractions. Guests who are not planning to take the excursion to Luxor will find very limited activities in Safaga itself, except for souvenir shopping at some tourist villages and diving and snorkeling tours at resort hotels. A half day trip to the resort of Hurghada is also an option.

Arrive
Depart
17:00
Day 55
8th Mar 2025
Ain Sukhna

Al-‘Ain al-Sokhna is a town in the Suez Governorate,...

Al-‘Ain al-Sokhna is a town in the Suez Governorate, lying on the western shore of the Red Sea’s Gulf of Suez. It is situated 55 kilometres south of Suez and approximately 120 kilometres east of Cairo.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
20:00
Day 56
9th Mar 2025
Suez Canal Transit

No information available

...

No information available

Arrive
04:30
Depart
18:00
Day 57
10th Mar 2025
Ashdod

From Ashdod’s port, it’s a just a short ride...

From Ashdod’s port, it’s a just a short ride to Jerusalem’s land of incredible religious significance and cultural wonder. A city like no other, Jerusalem is a melting pot of traditions, and a place of staggering complexity and immeasurably deep, impactful history. It’s almost impossible to fully digest Jerusalem’s importance in the scriptures of the world’s largest religions Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and this collision of faiths helps to make it one of the world’s most fascinating locations.

The Old City is the focal point for much of the religious reverence, with aged buildings from the world’s major faiths jostling for space, and melodic calls to prayer echoing down tight stone streets. Stroll the walkways to travel between deeply contrasting quarters, where you can sample roughly ripped pita bread, dipped into fresh, flavourful hummus. A place of unbridled passion and importance – but also extraordinary beauty – it’s easy to get swept away in the raw emotion that Jerusalem generates. Visit the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which archaeologists believe stands on the site where Jesus was crucified. Inside, emotional worshipers kneel before the stone where his body was wrapped in cloth in preparation for burial. The Wailing Wall is another place where passions run high, as worshipers place their folded messages into the wall’s cracks. Temple Mount’s golden dome glints in the sun nearby, signifying another point of pilgrimage for Jews – and for Muslims, who believe it is the place where Muhammad ascended to heaven.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 58
11th Mar 2025
Haifa, Israel

At less than 45 kilometres from Nazareth, Haifa is...

At less than 45 kilometres from Nazareth, Haifa is often neglected when it comes to travel experiences. And understandably so, as Nazareth is definitely the superstar of the region. The pilgrimage site is certainly a must for all believers of all denominations, and the chance of seeing where Jesus spent his childhood is too good an opportunity to pass up for some. If, however you go expecting to find a bucolic utopia then think again. View less

Nazareth today is bustling modern hub of a mega metropolis, which has grown up around the crumbling walls of the Old City. Nazareth Old City is stunning, and the historic sites where Jesus is believed to have lived and preached prior to his death are certainly bucket list. These include the Basilica of the Annunciation, where the Angel Gabriel visited Mary to inform her of her virgin birth, the Church of Joseph, the ancient site of Joseph’s carpentry shop and Cana (located on the shores of the Sea of Galilee), where Jesus performed his first miracle of turning water into wine. But that is not to say that Haifa itself is not worth a visit. The city – the third largest in Israel after Tel Aviv and Jerusalem – is a mosaic of cultures and faiths, with Jews, Christians, Muslims and Baháʼís all living peacefully side by side. The Baháʼí Gardens, part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, are without a doubt the city’s main attraction. Set on the flanks of Mont Carmel and sloping into the Mediterranean Sea, both the gardens and the city offer stunning views.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 60
13th Mar 2025
Rhodes, Greece

Located only seven miles from the Turkish coast, Rhode...

Located only seven miles from the Turkish coast, Rhodes is one of Greece’s favored vacation centers. In ancient times, the entrance to its harbor featured a celebrated landmark, the Colossus of Rhodes. The 105-foot statue rose from a 35-foot stone base and was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Rhodes was an important cultural center with a well-known School of Rhetoric attended by such historical figures as Cicero and Caesar. From a school for sculptors came the famous Laocoon group, which is now in the Vatican Museum. Rhodes’ most famous attractions originated with the Knights of St. John, who occupied parts of the island from 1308 to 1522. As their legacy they left a medieval town, dominated by the Palace of the Grand Masters and the Knights’ Hospital. The Old Town is encircled by one of the best-preserved walls in Europe. In addition to buildings that showcase the legacy of the Knights of St. John, there are plenty of shops and dining opportunities throughout the Old Town.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
20:00
Day 61
14th Mar 2025
Kusadasi, Turkey

Since the late 1970s, Kusadasi has grown from a fishing vi...

Since the late 1970s, Kusadasi has grown from a fishing village into a sprawling tourist center, serving thousands of visitors who flock here to visit the nearby ruins of Ephesus. Despite an incredible building boom and an influx of shops, Kusadasi has managed to retain much of its original charm.
The major attraction remains the archaeological site of ancient Ephesus, considered to be the most important one in all of Turkey. The history of this ancient city dates as far back as the 10th century BC. Many of the remarkable structures seen today are the result of an extraordinary excavation and restoration program. As you walk along the white marble road, grooved by ancient chariot wheels, the two-story Library of Celsus presents a striking sight. In addition, there are temples, houses of noblemen and community buildings lining the ancient streets. Nestled into the mountainside is the 25,000-seat amphitheater, still used today for performances during the Festival of Culture and Art.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 63
16th Mar 2025
Istanbul, Turkey

A chaotic, colossal collision of east and west ̵...

A chaotic, colossal collision of east and west – start your day in Europe and end it in Asia, all without breaking a sweat. Sprawling across two continents, the city has been toed, froed and yanked between countless civilisations over its history, leaving a multi-layered, majestic tapestry of culture to untangle. An army of narrow minarets puncture the skyline, while the soaring towers of palaces and labyrinths of bazaars – where bargains are the reward for brave hagglers – fill up this dynamic city of 15 million people. View less

With a rich portfolio of Byzantine and Ottoman architecture, Istanbul enjoys one of the world’s most dynamic skylines and has an intense, infectious energy. The vast Aya Sofya is the starting point for exploring this huge city’s deep wealth of cultural treasures. Built in the 6th century as a Greek Orthodox church, it was later transformed into an Ottoman imperial mosque – and latterly a museum. Cast your eyes up to take in the full scale of the colossal dome, one of the world’s largest, which floats on a magnificent bed of light. See the Blue Mosque, with its glorious blue İznik tiles, or head to the Galata Tower which was once the tallest structure in Istanbul, and is ideal for a panoramic view of the city. Grab handfuls of dates and spices, shop for jewellery and patterned fabrics as you’re swallowed whole by the Grand Bazaar – one of the world’s biggest and busiest covered indoor markets. To understand Istanbul is to visit its kahvehans. Few rituals are taken as seriously as Turkish coffee – prepared to be incredibly strong. Sweeten the aftertaste with Turkish delight, or baklava – try the smooth pistachio version called kuru baklava.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
Day 64
17th Mar 2025
Istanbul, Turkey

A chaotic, colossal collision of east and west – start...

A chaotic, colossal collision of east and west – start your day in Europe and end it in Asia, all without breaking a sweat. Sprawling across two continents, the city has been toed, froed and yanked between countless civilisations over its history, leaving a multi-layered, majestic tapestry of culture to untangle. An army of narrow minarets puncture the skyline, while the soaring towers of palaces and labyrinths of bazaars – where bargains are the reward for brave hagglers – fill up this dynamic city of 15 million people. View less

With a rich portfolio of Byzantine and Ottoman architecture, Istanbul enjoys one of the world’s most dynamic skylines and has an intense, infectious energy. The vast Aya Sofya is the starting point for exploring this huge city’s deep wealth of cultural treasures. Built in the 6th century as a Greek Orthodox church, it was later transformed into an Ottoman imperial mosque – and latterly a museum. Cast your eyes up to take in the full scale of the colossal dome, one of the world’s largest, which floats on a magnificent bed of light. See the Blue Mosque, with its glorious blue İznik tiles, or head to the Galata Tower which was once the tallest structure in Istanbul, and is ideal for a panoramic view of the city. Grab handfuls of dates and spices, shop for jewellery and patterned fabrics as you’re swallowed whole by the Grand Bazaar – one of the world’s biggest and busiest covered indoor markets. To understand Istanbul is to visit its kahvehans. Few rituals are taken as seriously as Turkish coffee – prepared to be incredibly strong. Sweeten the aftertaste with Turkish delight, or baklava – try the smooth pistachio version called kuru baklava.

Arrive
Depart
23:00
Day 66
19th Mar 2025
Thessaloniki

It is interesting to note that between the 17th and 20th cent...

It is interesting to note that between the 17th and 20th centuries Jews made up more than half the population as a result of the arrival in 1492 of some 20,000 Jews who had been expelled from Spain. They engaged in all trades and professions and played a predominant part in commerce and industry. Thessaloniki’s main hub centers around Aristotle Square, a traffic- free area surrounded by arcades that house cafes and restaurants. The pedestrian strip along the water’s edge makes for a popular seafront promenade. Two of the main thoroughfares, Odos Mitropoleos and Odos Tsimski, are lined with luxury shops and boutiques. On either side of Aristotle Street extends the picturesque Central Market where you will find numerous shops supplying domestic needs

Arrive
08:00
Depart
19:00
Day 67
20th Mar 2025
Volos, Greece

Volos is a commercial and industrial city; it is Greece’...

Volos is a commercial and industrial city; it is Greece’s third-largest port. Much of it has been rebuilt after a severe earthquake in 1955. The location in the gulf of the same name and near scenic Mount Pelion ensures this town an attractive setting. Interesting sites in the surrounding areas include imposing monasteries perched atop craggy mountains and a fine Archaeological Museum. Volos was founded in the 14th century in an area which has been occupied by man since the Neolithic era. A short distance out of Volos, the second millennium saw the establishment of the Mycenaen city of Iolkos, seat of King Pelias and home of his nephew Jason, who sailed from here with the Argonauts. Remains of Mycenaen buildings have been discovered near the river, where a palace stood around 1400 B.C. The main reason visitors come to Volos is to depart on excursions to the monasteries of Meteora. Their lofty position atop gigantic pinnacles makes them the area’s foremost attraction.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
19:00
Day 68
21st Mar 2025
Nafplion, Greece

The former capital of Greece is a popular town on...

The former capital of Greece is a popular town on the eastern coast of the Peloponnese. Stately, medieval architecture recalls its Venetian occupation in the 15th century. The most dominant structure from this time is the crenellated Palamidi Fortress towering high above the town.
The lively port and resort town spreads around a scenic harbor. Its center is crisscrossed by narrow streets, which are best negotiated on foot. Several monuments remain from the towns’ Turkish past, including a mosque and the parliament building. Relics from ancient sites are on display in the Archaeological Museum. Those who are interested in handicrafts and traditional costumes may enjoy a visit to the Folk Art Museum.
Enjoy exploring along the waterfront and around the main square of the Old Town. Open-air cafés and restaurants invite you for a break to enjoy a light snack or a seafood lunch while taking in the local atmosphere.

Arrive
12:00
Depart
23:00
Day 70
23rd Mar 2025
Siracusa

Honey-coloured Siracusa is a staggering UNESCO World Heritage...

Honey-coloured Siracusa is a staggering UNESCO World Heritage Site, and an extraordinary Sicilian city of immense ancient history. The modern population is a fraction of what it was at the city’s heyday around 400 BC, when Athens’ might was successfully challenged and faced down, reinforcing the city’s incredible power and status. Siracusa’s historical nucleus waits to be discovered on the compact islet of Ortygia. The city was founded here, but grew over time, spreading across to the mainland. View less

A small channel separates the two, which is now spanned by twin bridges. Wander the atmospheric streets of this time warp, to reach the shining elegance of Piazza Duomo. The Baroque cathedral rises like a giant sandcastle, and you can settle opposite to cradle a glass of wine and enjoy the view over the immaculate square – people watching before the glorious baroque façade. Dig deep into its history at the mainland’s archaeological park. Here you can wander between the remains of a Greek theatre, constructed in the 5th century BC, and now used as a grandiose, atmospheric venue for events and performances. You’ll also encounter a Roman Amphitheatre – where gladiators battled brutally, and the spectacular ear-shaped cave, which is famed for its extraordinary, secret-revealing acoustics. It was given its name – the Ear of Dionysius – by Caravaggio. Visit the legendary Fonte Arethusa, or lose yourself in the Ortygia Market – you’ll find everything here, from fresh fish, to spices and local bottles of wines. Look out for a flavour-filled jar of real Sicilian u strattu – an intense tomato paste that is the secret ingredient to many Sicilian recipes. The local ingredients are imbued with flavour by this volcanic land’s fertile soils and the firepower of Europe’s most active volcano Mount Etna, waits just to the north.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 71
24th Mar 2025
Siracusa

Honey-coloured Siracusa is a staggering UNESCO World Heritage Si...

Honey-coloured Siracusa is a staggering UNESCO World Heritage Site, and an extraordinary Sicilian city of immense ancient history. The modern population is a fraction of what it was at the city’s heyday around 400 BC, when Athens’ might was successfully challenged and faced down, reinforcing the city’s incredible power and status. Siracusa’s historical nucleus waits to be discovered on the compact islet of Ortygia. The city was founded here, but grew over time, spreading across to the mainland. View less

A small channel separates the two, which is now spanned by twin bridges. Wander the atmospheric streets of this time warp, to reach the shining elegance of Piazza Duomo. The Baroque cathedral rises like a giant sandcastle, and you can settle opposite to cradle a glass of wine and enjoy the view over the immaculate square – people watching before the glorious baroque façade. Dig deep into its history at the mainland’s archaeological park. Here you can wander between the remains of a Greek theatre, constructed in the 5th century BC, and now used as a grandiose, atmospheric venue for events and performances. You’ll also encounter a Roman Amphitheatre – where gladiators battled brutally, and the spectacular ear-shaped cave, which is famed for its extraordinary, secret-revealing acoustics. It was given its name – the Ear of Dionysius – by Caravaggio. Visit the legendary Fonte Arethusa, or lose yourself in the Ortygia Market – you’ll find everything here, from fresh fish, to spices and local bottles of wines. Look out for a flavour-filled jar of real Sicilian u strattu – an intense tomato paste that is the secret ingredient to many Sicilian recipes. The local ingredients are imbued with flavour by this volcanic land’s fertile soils and the firepower of Europe’s most active volcano Mount Etna, waits just to the north.

Arrive
Depart
13:00
Day 72
25th Mar 2025
Naples, Italy

The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 yea...

The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 years before Rome was founded. Pompeii, too, was a Greek town before being conquered by the Romans during the 5th century BC. It was under the Romans that Pompeii flourished and grew prosperous. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples’ National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 73
26th Mar 2025
Naples, Italy

The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers som...

The region of Campania was home to Greeks settlers some 300 years before Rome was founded. Pompeii, too, was a Greek town before being conquered by the Romans during the 5th century BC. It was under the Romans that Pompeii flourished and grew prosperous. When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the population of 20,000 was wiped out, but dozens of buildings were preserved under layers of cinder more than 20 feet deep. The most important finds from Pompeii are displayed in Naples’ National Archaeological Museum. A visit here will no doubt enhance a visit to ancient Pompeii.

Arrive
Depart
19:00
Day 76
29th Mar 2025
Malaga, Spain

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is the...

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is the region’s capital and a popular holiday destination. The city is known as the birthplace of Pablo Picasso and for the sweet Malaga dessert wines that come from the hilly vineyards just outside of town. Other points of interest include impressive Gothic architecture, the remains of a Moorish castle and several interesting museums. A pleasant town to explore, Malaga also serves as a popular starting point for trips to Granada and resorts along the Costa del Sol. Granada and the famed Alhambra are the region’s most outstanding attractions. Here, magnificent Moorish palaces and fortifications contrast sharply with Christian churches from Spain’s significant era of the 1492 Reconquest, in which King Ferdinand put an end to eight centuries of Moorish rule. Other worthwhile destinations from Malaga include such well-known resorts as Marbella and the white village of Mijas, located on the hillside above the coastal towns of Torremolinos and Fuengirola.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 77
30th Mar 2025
Malaga, Spain

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is...

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is the region’s capital and a popular holiday destination. The city is known as the birthplace of Pablo Picasso and for the sweet Malaga dessert wines that come from the hilly vineyards just outside of town. Other points of interest include impressive Gothic architecture, the remains of a Moorish castle and several interesting museums. A pleasant town to explore, Malaga also serves as a popular starting point for trips to Granada and resorts along the Costa del Sol. Granada and the famed Alhambra are the region’s most outstanding attractions. Here, magnificent Moorish palaces and fortifications contrast sharply with Christian churches from Spain’s significant era of the 1492 Reconquest, in which King Ferdinand put an end to eight centuries of Moorish rule. Other worthwhile destinations from Malaga include such well-known resorts as Marbella and the white village of Mijas, located on the hillside above the coastal towns of Torremolinos and Fuengirola.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 78
31st Mar 2025
Cadiz, Spain

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves s...

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 79
1st Apr 2025
Cadiz, Spain

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across th...

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Arrive
Depart
14:00
Day 80
2nd Apr 2025
Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open t...

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 81
3rd Apr 2025
Lisbon

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea ...

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Arrive
Depart
17:00
Day 83
5th Apr 2025
Bilbao, Spain

Whether it’s the flow of its boundary pushing arc...

Whether it’s the flow of its boundary pushing architecture, delights of its finger food tapas, or sweeps of gorgeous shoreline nearby, Bilbao is a city that places a premium on aesthetics. The relentless drive to all things beautiful may be a reaction to the city’s industrial past, but it has led this Basque city to emerge as a new beacon of artistry. American architect Frank Gehry’s masterpiece of flowing metal is the shining standout here, a perfect harmony of smooth titanium and glass, and a thrilling piece in itself.

Inside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, world-class exhibitions are exhibited in the bright, expansive interior – which practically begs you to explore more. The city has gorgeous historical presence too. Casco Viejo – the medieval area – is its historic core, and home to the original seven streets and cathedral, dating back to the 14thcentury. Tall banks of coloured buildings rise either side as you walk, dwarfed by a tide of pretty facades, overflowing flower boxes, and intricate rail balconies. Plaza Nueva is Bilbao’s neoclassical square, with a procession of arches all around you. Morning flea markets regularly overtake it, offering opportunities to pick through piles of coins, dusty books and rusted antiques on the hunt for bargains, in this most elegant setting. The titanic Mercado de la Ribera market looms tall by the river. Explore to eat your way through an endless pile of Basque pintxos – the local take on tapas. Cocktail sticks will quickly stack up as you gorge on plump olives, organic cheeses, and feather thin slices of curled hams, while orbiting Europe’s largest covered market. Described as a perfect blend of beauty and function by UNESCO, the Vizcaya Bridge is an unusual but spectacular piece of industrial architecture. The world’s oldest, gigantic transporter crane is still in use today, swinging cars and passengers from one side of the gaping Nervion River’s mouth to the other.

Arrive
09:00
Depart
23:00
Day 84
6th Apr 2025
Bordeaux, France

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, ...

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Arrive
15:45
Depart
Day 85
7th Apr 2025
Bordeaux, France

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splas...

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Arrive
Depart
Day 86
8th Apr 2025
Bordeaux, France

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, s...

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Arrive
Depart
17:00
Day 88
10th Apr 2025
Saint Malo (Brittany)

Ship sails flutter in the breeze, at the natural port of Sa...

Ship sails flutter in the breeze, at the natural port of Saint-Malo – a historic and resilient walled city, which watches out over golden sands and island fortresses. Strung tenuously to the mainland, Saint Malo was the historic home of a rowdy mix of skilled sailors and new world explorers – as well as the plunderers who earned the place its ‘Pirate City’ title. Some of history’s great voyages have launched from here – including Jacques Cartier’s, which led to the settlement of New France and modern-day Quebec. View less

Founded by a Welsh monk, who made his way here in the 6th century, Saint Malo’s castle is forged from sheer granite, and its steep defensive ramparts arise defiantly. The atmospheric walled town turns its back to the mainland and gazes out longingly into the sea. Explore streets that breathe with maritime tales and medieval charm – restored from the intense damage sustained during the Second World War. Cathédrale de St Malo rises above the tight paths, offering views of the peppered islands and fortifications. Boatloads of fresh oysters and scallops are heaved ashore – savour them or grab savoury crepes galettes, stuffed with cheese and ham. Wash Saint Malo’s foods down with a Brittany cider, which challenges wine as the indulgence of choice in these parts. A highly tidal region, the pocket-sized islands of Petit Bé and Grand Bé join the mainland, and you can explore at leisure as the tide recedes. The incredible island of Mont Saint Michel also looms in the estuary of the Couesnon River nearby, hovering like a cinematic mirage above high tide’s waters. Elsewhere, Cap Fréhel’s lush green peninsula juts out from the emerald coast towards Jersey, tempting with rich coastal hiking trails.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 89
11th Apr 2025
St. Peter Port, Guernsey

Twenty-five square mile (40 sq km) Guernsey is the seco...

Twenty-five square mile (40 sq km) Guernsey is the second largest of the Channel Islands, which lie in the English Channel west of the Cherbourg peninsula. Along with its sister island of Jersey, Guernsey has been a part of Britain since 1066, though retaining a culture entirely of its own.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 90
12th Apr 2025
Southampton

Standing on a triangular peninsula formed at the ...

Standing on a triangular peninsula formed at the place where the rivers Itchen and Test flow into an eight-mile inlet from the Solent, Southampton has figured in numerous stirring events and for centuries has been of strategic maritime importance. It was from here that the Pilgrim Fathers departed for America in the tiny Mayflower in 1620 and many great ocean liners, such as the Queen Mary and the Titanic have followed since. The image of the thousand-year-old city was greatly blemished by the bombing during World War II and postwar planning caused changes almost beyond recognition.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
19:00
Day 91
13th Apr 2025
Rouen, France

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, ...

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen’s status as a commercial and cultural center reaches as far back as the Middle Ages. As a result of its importance, the city was the target of many sieges. During the English occupation in the Hundred Years’ War, Rouen was the site where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Other tragedies include the destruction of a major part of the commercial and industrial center during bombing raids in World War II.
Today the city presents an interesting mix of medieval and modern architecture. Rouen expanded outward during the 20th century with the development of industries; its increasingly busy port is now the fourth largest in France. The city’s greatest attraction is its historic center. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” many of its important edifices are churches. Dominating the large central square is the magnificent Notre-Dame Cathedral, a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. You may recognize the west façade of the cathedral from a series of studies by Claude Monet, which are now displayed in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Surrounding the square are picturesque half-timbered houses with steeply pointed roofs. The wealth of architectural treasures and the ambiance of Rouen’s historic center never fail to impress visitors.

Rouen also serves as a gateway to Paris. Driving distance is 2 hours by car or 1.5 hours by train. (Trains arrive in Paris at St. Lazare Station.)

Arrive
15:45
Depart
Day 92
14th Apr 2025
Rouen, France

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen&...

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen’s status as a commercial and cultural center reaches as far back as the Middle Ages. As a result of its importance, the city was the target of many sieges. During the English occupation in the Hundred Years’ War, Rouen was the site where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Other tragedies include the destruction of a major part of the commercial and industrial center during bombing raids in World War II.
Today the city presents an interesting mix of medieval and modern architecture. Rouen expanded outward during the 20th century with the development of industries; its increasingly busy port is now the fourth largest in France. The city’s greatest attraction is its historic center. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” many of its important edifices are churches. Dominating the large central square is the magnificent Notre-Dame Cathedral, a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. You may recognize the west façade of the cathedral from a series of studies by Claude Monet, which are now displayed in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Surrounding the square are picturesque half-timbered houses with steeply pointed roofs. The wealth of architectural treasures and the ambiance of Rouen’s historic center never fail to impress visitors.

Rouen also serves as a gateway to Paris. Driving distance is 2 hours by car or 1.5 hours by train. (Trains arrive in Paris at St. Lazare Station.)

Arrive
Depart
Day 93
15th Apr 2025
Rouen, France

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, RouenR...

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen’s status as a commercial and cultural center reaches as far back as the Middle Ages. As a result of its importance, the city was the target of many sieges. During the English occupation in the Hundred Years’ War, Rouen was the site where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Other tragedies include the destruction of a major part of the commercial and industrial center during bombing raids in World War II.
Today the city presents an interesting mix of medieval and modern architecture. Rouen expanded outward during the 20th century with the development of industries; its increasingly busy port is now the fourth largest in France. The city’s greatest attraction is its historic center. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” many of its important edifices are churches. Dominating the large central square is the magnificent Notre-Dame Cathedral, a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. You may recognize the west façade of the cathedral from a series of studies by Claude Monet, which are now displayed in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Surrounding the square are picturesque half-timbered houses with steeply pointed roofs. The wealth of architectural treasures and the ambiance of Rouen’s historic center never fail to impress visitors.

Rouen also serves as a gateway to Paris. Driving distance is 2 hours by car or 1.5 hours by train. (Trains arrive in Paris at St. Lazare Station.)

Arrive
Depart
19:15
Day 95
17th Apr 2025
Amsterdam

Few can resist the grand beauty of Amsterdam’...

Few can resist the grand beauty of Amsterdam’s famous canals, which thread through this place of evocative beauty and thrilling contrast. Open-minded and tolerant, Amsterdam is a place for history buffs and hedonists alike, and its diverse neighbourhoods have something for everyone – whether it’s the beachside relaxation of Bloemendaal, nocturnal thuds of Buiksloterham, or characterful charm of Jordaan. 160 serene canals serve as the arteries of this city, imbuing it with its unique essence.

Cruise along concentric waterways, past cherry red and oak-wood cladded houseboats, as you learn of its Golden Age history. Culture is also deep in Amsterdam’s DNA, and the Van Gogh Museum – which pays tribute to the tortured genius of the Dutch post-impressionist artist – stands out among its leading museums and galleries. One of history’s greatest tragedies is also rendered in heart-breaking clarity at Anne Frank House. Visit the site where the precocious teenager hid from the Nazi regime for so long, and the room where she penned the most famous diary ever written. Compact and easily walkable, Amsterdam remains consistently postcard-perfect as you watch bright bicycles trundling over ornate bridges, and stumble across hidden, tulip-decorated courtyards. ‘Gezellig’ is the local word for Amsterdam’s unhurried outlook on life. No translation can quite do the concept justice, but you’ll recognise it instinctively as hours float by in a happy haze browsing De Negen Straatjes street’s independent shops, or as you sip coffee with gooey stroopwafel. Broodje haring – a raw herring sandwich – is Amsterdam’s must-try delicacy, but many visitors find tompouce, a delicious pastry topped with vivid pink icing, a little more to their taste.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 96
18th Apr 2025
Amsterdam

Few can resist the grand beauty of Amsterdam’s famou...

Few can resist the grand beauty of Amsterdam’s famous canals, which thread through this place of evocative beauty and thrilling contrast. Open-minded and tolerant, Amsterdam is a place for history buffs and hedonists alike, and its diverse neighbourhoods have something for everyone – whether it’s the beachside relaxation of Bloemendaal, nocturnal thuds of Buiksloterham, or characterful charm of Jordaan. 160 serene canals serve as the arteries of this city, imbuing it with its unique essence.

Cruise along concentric waterways, past cherry red and oak-wood cladded houseboats, as you learn of its Golden Age history. Culture is also deep in Amsterdam’s DNA, and the Van Gogh Museum – which pays tribute to the tortured genius of the Dutch post-impressionist artist – stands out among its leading museums and galleries. One of history’s greatest tragedies is also rendered in heart-breaking clarity at Anne Frank House. Visit the site where the precocious teenager hid from the Nazi regime for so long, and the room where she penned the most famous diary ever written. Compact and easily walkable, Amsterdam remains consistently postcard-perfect as you watch bright bicycles trundling over ornate bridges, and stumble across hidden, tulip-decorated courtyards. ‘Gezellig’ is the local word for Amsterdam’s unhurried outlook on life. No translation can quite do the concept justice, but you’ll recognise it instinctively as hours float by in a happy haze browsing De Negen Straatjes street’s independent shops, or as you sip coffee with gooey stroopwafel. Broodje haring – a raw herring sandwich – is Amsterdam’s must-try delicacy, but many visitors find tompouce, a delicious pastry topped with vivid pink icing, a little more to their taste.

Arrive
Depart
23:59
Day 98
20th Apr 2025
Hamburg, Germany

A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg is an outward-...

A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg is an outward-looking city, with a unique flow of its own. Nestled snugly between the Baltic and North seas, Germany’s second-biggest city is intersected by a frayed network of rivers and canals, spanned by hundreds of pretty bridges. The comparisons are obvious – but Hamburg’s reputation as the ‘Venice of the North’ is a little wide of the mark. View less

This quirky, heritage-filled city has a distinct character and open outlook all of its own, and continues to relish its role as Germany’s gateway to the world. The water brought Hamburg its wealth, and vast redbrick warehouses stack up against the waterfront in the Speicherstadt district – now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They linger from the era when the city was a Hanseatic League trading capital and the warehouses essentially formed a city unto themselves, with goods brought and exchanged from distant shores. Elsewhere, the Reeperbahn is a notorious and unabashed street of nocturnal mischief, with shifty neon-lit nightclubs, in amongst the city’s famous red-light district. Hamburg has a much more wholesome side too, however, and is a powerhouse of museums, theatre and culture. It’s littered with over 100 music venues and the city played a crucial role in The Beatles’ early story. The spectacular Elbphilharmonie concert hall, with its wavy, surrealistic interior, is a work of art in and of itself. The city has been named a European Green Capital, and the vast Lake Alster adds to the airy, pleasant atmosphere, providing a spacious oasis of tranquillity. Planten un Blomen is another burst of zesty colour, where fountains fan out, and lilypads float on rhododendron-lined lakes.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 99
21st Apr 2025
Hamburg, Germany

A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg i...

A true city of water, effortlessly cool Hamburg is an outward-looking city, with a unique flow of its own. Nestled snugly between the Baltic and North seas, Germany’s second-biggest city is intersected by a frayed network of rivers and canals, spanned by hundreds of pretty bridges. The comparisons are obvious – but Hamburg’s reputation as the ‘Venice of the North’ is a little wide of the mark. View less

This quirky, heritage-filled city has a distinct character and open outlook all of its own, and continues to relish its role as Germany’s gateway to the world. The water brought Hamburg its wealth, and vast redbrick warehouses stack up against the waterfront in the Speicherstadt district – now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They linger from the era when the city was a Hanseatic League trading capital and the warehouses essentially formed a city unto themselves, with goods brought and exchanged from distant shores. Elsewhere, the Reeperbahn is a notorious and unabashed street of nocturnal mischief, with shifty neon-lit nightclubs, in amongst the city’s famous red-light district. Hamburg has a much more wholesome side too, however, and is a powerhouse of museums, theatre and culture. It’s littered with over 100 music venues and the city played a crucial role in The Beatles’ early story. The spectacular Elbphilharmonie concert hall, with its wavy, surrealistic interior, is a work of art in and of itself. The city has been named a European Green Capital, and the vast Lake Alster adds to the airy, pleasant atmosphere, providing a spacious oasis of tranquillity. Planten un Blomen is another burst of zesty colour, where fountains fan out, and lilypads float on rhododendron-lined lakes.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 101
23rd Apr 2025
Copenhagen, Denmark

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is a conte...

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is a contemporary, clean and classy highlight of Scandinavia. A city built to be liveable, Copenhagen has refused to compromise, resulting in a forward-thinking metropolis that’s green and clean. Swim in the waters of Havnebadet Islands during summer, or shelter from winter’s bite by snuggling in beside a roaring open fire during winter. You can even hop on a train to Sweden, traversing the famous span of a Nordic Noir star – the Öresund Bridge.

It takes just a touch over half an hour to step off the train in Malmö. There’s only one way to truly explore Copenhagen and that’s on two wheels. Easy bike hire schemes will get you moving across this flat city, designed with bikes at the forefront of the mind. Choose a model with electronic assistance to take the strain out of any journey, giving you the freedom to whizz around and explore the modern angular architecture of the centre, and the pastoral colours of Nyhavn waterfront. Head out to the Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale – the strikingly-restrained statue is the perfect landmark for Copenhagen; unshowy, self-assured and utterly irresistible. The Danish concept of hygge is very much alive here, and you’ll feel that warm cosy feeling as you visit cafes illuminated by the warm glow of hanging filament bulbs, and stuffed to the brim with thick, dusty books. Home to mega-brewer Carlsberg, Copenhagen is also a city for hop enthusiasts, and there is a thriving craft brewing scene to sample. Danish Smørrebrød sandwiches are a must try, or for something a little more substantial, settle in for a culinary voyage and try a taster menu – the city’s restaurants are littered with Michelin stars.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 102
24th Apr 2025
Copenhagen, Denmark

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is ...

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is a contemporary, clean and classy highlight of Scandinavia. A city built to be liveable, Copenhagen has refused to compromise, resulting in a forward-thinking metropolis that’s green and clean. Swim in the waters of Havnebadet Islands during summer, or shelter from winter’s bite by snuggling in beside a roaring open fire during winter. You can even hop on a train to Sweden, traversing the famous span of a Nordic Noir star – the Öresund Bridge.

It takes just a touch over half an hour to step off the train in Malmö. There’s only one way to truly explore Copenhagen and that’s on two wheels. Easy bike hire schemes will get you moving across this flat city, designed with bikes at the forefront of the mind. Choose a model with electronic assistance to take the strain out of any journey, giving you the freedom to whizz around and explore the modern angular architecture of the centre, and the pastoral colours of Nyhavn waterfront. Head out to the Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale – the strikingly-restrained statue is the perfect landmark for Copenhagen; unshowy, self-assured and utterly irresistible. The Danish concept of hygge is very much alive here, and you’ll feel that warm cosy feeling as you visit cafes illuminated by the warm glow of hanging filament bulbs, and stuffed to the brim with thick, dusty books. Home to mega-brewer Carlsberg, Copenhagen is also a city for hop enthusiasts, and there is a thriving craft brewing scene to sample. Danish Smørrebrød sandwiches are a must try, or for something a little more substantial, settle in for a culinary voyage and try a taster menu – the city’s restaurants are littered with Michelin stars.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 104
26th Apr 2025
Helsinki, Finland

“A thriving, flawlessly-designed seaside city, Helsi...

“A thriving, flawlessly-designed seaside city, Helsinki is famously livable and inspiring. A regional powerhouse of outstanding design and creativity, Helsinki lies across a confetti scattering of 300 islands and skerries in the Gulf of Finland. Known for the light granite hue of its buildings – which lend the city a bright, whitewashed appearance – traditional buildings mingle seamlessly with bold new structures, showcasing Finland’s celebrated design outlook. Helsinki Cathedral is the crowning glory – rising high over the city’s waterfront with its pearly white domes gleaming. View less

A city that reveres knowledge and creativity above all else, artworks and statues litter the streets and parks, honouring creative minds of the past. Open parks offer space to lie back and soak up summer’s sun, while sculptures like the abstract organs of the Sibelius Monument celebrate national heroes like composer Jean Sibelius – whose music gave Finland national identity in the quest for independence. Feel the stunning acoustics of the incredible Rock Church deep in your gut, as you witness a performance in this collaboration between man and nature. Built into the rock underground, the amphitheatre’s soaring copper bowl roof is suspended dramatically on a bed of glass windows. One of Helsinki’s many incredible buildings, the Design Museum offers a comprehensive insight into the city’s balance of style, function and form. Helsinki’s easy-going, forward-thinking way of life was hard fought for, and the spectacular Suomenlinna fortress rears out of the waves as a reminder of the historical struggles that have played out in this stretch of sea. The chain of forts covers six islands and was built to defend the archipelago when it fell under Swedish rule. Sail out to the quaint little beaches, and waterfront pathways that now lend a calm, peaceful ambience to this UNESCO World Heritage Site.”

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 105
27th Apr 2025
Tallinn

Estonia’s capital, Tallinn, lies just 53 miles (85 km) fr...

Estonia’s capital, Tallinn, lies just 53 miles (85 km) from Helsinki across the Gulf of Finland, midway between St. Petersburg and Stockholm. The first recorded stronghold was built here by Estonians in the 10th-century, only to be taken over by the powerful seafaring Danes in 1219. In 1285, Tallinn was incorporated into the successful Hanseatic League, a German mercantile group operating in Northern Europe during medieval times. Because of its strategic location, Tallinn experienced many different occupations over the centuries, which resulted in a cultural mix that lends a unique ambiance to this maritime city.
The proud people of Estonia, along with their Latvian and Lithuanian neighbours, endured Soviet rule for over 50 years. Then in 1991, following the great upheaval in the Soviet Union, these three brave countries proudly joined the world of independent nations and finally enjoyed their freedom.
Estonia is surrounded by water. The country’s 17,000 square miles (27,200 sq. km) include a staggering 800 islands and more than 1,500 lakes. Water sports are quite popular during the summer months and fishing is a national pastime.
The Old Town, with its cobbled streets and 13th- and 14th-century buildings, attracts thousands of visitors each year. They come to admire the city’s heritage of medieval buildings, the imposing Town Hall that dates back to 1454, the Orthodox Cathedral, Toompea Castle and Oleviste Church – all prominent architectural landmarks. Sip coffee in a waterfront café and reflect on recent and current events.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 106
28th Apr 2025
Tallinn

Estonia’s capital, Tallinn, lies just 53 miles (85 km...

Estonia’s capital, Tallinn, lies just 53 miles (85 km) from Helsinki across the Gulf of Finland, midway between St. Petersburg and Stockholm. The first recorded stronghold was built here by Estonians in the 10th-century, only to be taken over by the powerful seafaring Danes in 1219. In 1285, Tallinn was incorporated into the successful Hanseatic League, a German mercantile group operating in Northern Europe during medieval times. Because of its strategic location, Tallinn experienced many different occupations over the centuries, which resulted in a cultural mix that lends a unique ambiance to this maritime city.
The proud people of Estonia, along with their Latvian and Lithuanian neighbours, endured Soviet rule for over 50 years. Then in 1991, following the great upheaval in the Soviet Union, these three brave countries proudly joined the world of independent nations and finally enjoyed their freedom.
Estonia is surrounded by water. The country’s 17,000 square miles (27,200 sq. km) include a staggering 800 islands and more than 1,500 lakes. Water sports are quite popular during the summer months and fishing is a national pastime.
The Old Town, with its cobbled streets and 13th- and 14th-century buildings, attracts thousands of visitors each year. They come to admire the city’s heritage of medieval buildings, the imposing Town Hall that dates back to 1454, the Orthodox Cathedral, Toompea Castle and Oleviste Church – all prominent architectural landmarks. Sip coffee in a waterfront café and reflect on recent and current events.

Arrive
Depart
17:00
Day 107
29th Apr 2025
Stockholm, Sweden

Founded in the 13th century, Stockholm is Sweden&...

Founded in the 13th century, Stockholm is Sweden’s strikingly elegant and beautiful capital, spread out over many islands at the meeting point of the Baltic with Lake Mälaren. Stockholm, noted for its outstanding architecture, is one of Scandinavia’s most attractive cities. In addition to its many man-made monuments, Stockholm boasts a world of natural beauty. One third of the city’s total land area is devoted to parks.
Guided by a strong belief in individual freedom, Sweden is governed by a constitution that is the oldest in use in Europe. The country’s neutrality has allowed it to avoid wars for more than 150 years. Its cities and industries remained intact during both World Wars. A distinct political philosophy has also added significantly to the nation’s success. Many of the country’s social achievements can be attributed to the development of the “welfare state” early in the 20th century. This provides its citizens with excellent medical care and substantial retirement benefits. Sweden is recognized as one of the world leaders in matters of health care and life expectancy. Education standards are high, accounting for the country’s 100% literacy rate.

The Swedes are proud of their country and take great care to preserve its great natural beauty. As the country’s major city, Stockholm offers a wealth of monuments and sites, fine museums and a rich culture. There are also hundreds of excellent restaurants as well as a great selection of trendy boutiques and exciting nightclubs.

Visitors should start their exploration of Stockholm at Gamla Stan, the Old Town located on an island in the center of the city. This is the city’s most attractive part, which has retained its medieval charm. The maze of narrow, cobbled streets is best explored on foot.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 108
30th Apr 2025
Stockholm, Sweden

Founded in the 13th century, Stockholm is Sweden’s str...

Founded in the 13th century, Stockholm is Sweden’s strikingly elegant and beautiful capital, spread out over many islands at the meeting point of the Baltic with Lake Mälaren. Stockholm, noted for its outstanding architecture, is one of Scandinavia’s most attractive cities. In addition to its many man-made monuments, Stockholm boasts a world of natural beauty. One third of the city’s total land area is devoted to parks.
Guided by a strong belief in individual freedom, Sweden is governed by a constitution that is the oldest in use in Europe. The country’s neutrality has allowed it to avoid wars for more than 150 years. Its cities and industries remained intact during both World Wars. A distinct political philosophy has also added significantly to the nation’s success. Many of the country’s social achievements can be attributed to the development of the “welfare state” early in the 20th century. This provides its citizens with excellent medical care and substantial retirement benefits. Sweden is recognized as one of the world leaders in matters of health care and life expectancy. Education standards are high, accounting for the country’s 100% literacy rate.

The Swedes are proud of their country and take great care to preserve its great natural beauty. As the country’s major city, Stockholm offers a wealth of monuments and sites, fine museums and a rich culture. There are also hundreds of excellent restaurants as well as a great selection of trendy boutiques and exciting nightclubs.

Visitors should start their exploration of Stockholm at Gamla Stan, the Old Town located on an island in the center of the city. This is the city’s most attractive part, which has retained its medieval charm. The maze of narrow, cobbled streets is best explored on foot.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 111
3rd May 2025
Longyearbyen/Oslo, Norway

Longyearbyen is the biggest settlement in Svalbard. Seat ...

Longyearbyen is the biggest settlement in Svalbard. Seat of the Norwegian administration, it also has the best services and infrastructure in the archipelago. Located deep in the Adventfjord, a sidearm of the Isfjorden (Icefjord), Longyearbyen’s airport can be used all-year round, but its harbor is blocked by ice in winter. Most shops, hotels, restaurants and a hospital are within easy walking distance of the port. One of the most prominent buildings in town is the UNIS center, where several Norwegian universities have joined forces to operate and offer the northernmost higher education to both Norwegian and international students. Adjacent to UNIS, and well worth a visit, is the Svalbard Museum, covering the natural history and exploitation of Svalbard. Remnants of the former mining activity can be seen all around Longyearbyen and even in town.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 112
4th May 2025
Longyearbyen/Oslo, Norway

Longyearbyen is the biggest settlement in Svalbard. Seat...

Longyearbyen is the biggest settlement in Svalbard. Seat of the Norwegian administration, it also has the best services and infrastructure in the archipelago. Located deep in the Adventfjord, a sidearm of the Isfjorden (Icefjord), Longyearbyen’s airport can be used all-year round, but its harbor is blocked by ice in winter. Most shops, hotels, restaurants and a hospital are within easy walking distance of the port. One of the most prominent buildings in town is the UNIS center, where several Norwegian universities have joined forces to operate and offer the northernmost higher education to both Norwegian and international students. Adjacent to UNIS, and well worth a visit, is the Svalbard Museum, covering the natural history and exploitation of Svalbard. Remnants of the former mining activity can be seen all around Longyearbyen and even in town.

Arrive
Depart
23:00
Day 114
6th May 2025
Bergen, Norway

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen&...

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen’s World Heritage waterfront lean together charmingly, welcoming visitors to this city at the heart of Norway’s most extraordinary cinematic landscapes. It may be the country’s second largest city, but the villagey feel here always provides a warm welcome – even when the weather is living up to its famously damp reputation. Bergen’s colourful waterfront, Bryggen, is a ramshackle line-up of incredible Hanseatic warehouses, built following the devastating fire of 1702, which ransacked the city.

These iconic warehouses have stood proudly ever since, with Bergen growing and expanding around the colourful facades. Behind them, a labyrinth of narrow alleyways and wooden decking waits, alive with artisan craft shops and bustling galleries. Fløyen mountain watches over the city, and you can take a short but steep hike up to the panoramic viewpoints, or jump on the funicular, which trundles visitors up and down the incline. At the top, spectacular views of Bergen jutting out into the dark seas below unfold before your eyes. Wait until evening to see the sunset painting glorious golden light across the city and waves, and Bergen’s lights flickering into life. Nærøyfjorden, a deeply etched fjord nearby, is perhaps Norway’s most photographed and iconic piece of scenery. A cruise through the base of this spectacular narrow fjord, parting the glass-smooth inky waters, is an utterly humbling experience, as the claustrophobically-close slopes rise imposingly over you. Sognefjord also stretches out nearby, and is Norway’s longest fjord, adorned with plunging waterfalls and vibrant farms during summer.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 116
8th May 2025
Torshavn

More than 600 miles (nearly 1,000 kilometres) from Denma...

More than 600 miles (nearly 1,000 kilometres) from Denmark’s west coast lie the Faroes, a triangle of eighteen windswept islands, seventeen of which are inhabited. Only 48,500 people plus some 70,000 sheep roam these remote lands. Much of the islands’ heritage reflects a medieval past, beginning with the arrival of farmers from western Norway who settled here in the 9th century. Evidence of this Scandinavian heritage is preserved through centuries of isolation; ancient structures can still be seen in villages clustered around old churches.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 118
10th May 2025
Akureyri, Iceland

Iceland’s Capital of the North is the gateway to a t...

Iceland’s Capital of the North is the gateway to a thrilling land of roaring waterfalls, soaring volcanoes and glorious wildlife. It may lie a mere 60 miles from the Arctic Circle, but Akureyi blossoms with a bright, cosmopolitan feel, and explodes into life during the summer months, when its outdoor cafes and open-air bathing spots fill up with visitors ready to immerse themselves in Iceland’s cinematic scenery. Feel the thundering impact of Iceland’s celebrated natural wonders shaking your bones at Godafoss Waterfalls, known as the ‘Waterfalls of the Gods’.

Here, the Skjálfandafljót river unleashes a colossal torrent of water over charcoal-black rocks below. Or, find some peace at the Botanical Gardens, which opened in 1957 and offer space for contemplation – amid plants that bloom with unexpected vibrancy, even at this northerly latitude. The Lutheran, Akureyrarkirkja Church rises like a grand church organ and is the town’s most striking landmark. The 112-step climb is worth the effort to see light flooding in through its narrow stain glass windows, spreading colourful patchworks across the interior. Magic and mythology are important elements of Icelandic folklore, and you’ll even bump into giant sculptures of grizzled, child-snatching trolls on the town’s high street. Or, meet more earthly – but no less magical – creatures in the waters around Akureyi, where immense blue whales cruise by and dolphins playfully leap. A trip to the northerly Grimsey island will take you on an inspiring adventure traversing the Arctic Circle to a remote island where flame-beaked puffins nod on cliff-side perches and razorbills nest. Brush up on your puffin-watching skills with our blog.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 119
11th May 2025
Isafjordur, Iceland

The town of Ísafjördur is the municipal...

The town of Ísafjördur is the municipal centre of the West Fjords peninsula. The West Fjords are Iceland’s least populated region, with 9,600 inhabitants in the area of nearly 6,000 square miles (9,520 sq km). Ísafjörður, with a present population of approximately 3,500, was formerly one of Iceland’s main trading posts and as such, was granted municipal status in 1886. Some of Iceland’s oldest and best-preserved buildings, dating from the 18th century, are located in Ísafjördur.
The town is still predominantly a fishing centre. A vigorous and varied cultural and artistic scene flourishes as well. Mountains surround Ísafjördur on the three sides and the sea on the other. The ancient settlement site of Eyri downtown is enclosed by the narrow Skutulsfjordur fjord, which shelters the harbour in all weathers.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 120
12th May 2025
Reykjavik, Iceland

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue...

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country’s volcanic regions.
The island’s settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

As Iceland’s capital and main center of the country’s population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country’s total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland’s imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country’s exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world’s most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland’s number one export.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
Day 121
13th May 2025
Reykjavik, Iceland

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and bl...

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country’s volcanic regions.
The island’s settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

As Iceland’s capital and main center of the country’s population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country’s total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland’s imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country’s exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world’s most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland’s number one export.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 124
16th May 2025
Qaqortoq

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq ha...

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it’s easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. View less

Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 125
17th May 2025
Nuuk

In the bustling capital city of Greenland, you could be forgive...

In the bustling capital city of Greenland, you could be forgiven for forgetting you are in such a vast and isolated country. Nuuk is Greenland’s economic and social hub, home to more than a third of Greenland’s population, and although it feels like a world capital, scratch the surface, and a uniquely Greenlandic character can be found underneath. Nuuk Cathedral overlooks the gorgeous old Colonial Harbour district and the Greenland National Museum, resting place of the legendary Qilakitsoq mummies, the true highlight of the museum’s archaeological collection. View less

Above the Colonial Harbour sits downtown Nuuk, with lines of Scandistyle apartments, a bustling shopping district, the Greenlandic Parliament, Nuuk City Hall (which welcomes visitors to see its artwork) and even outdoor cafes selling locally produced food and beer. These nods to modernity compete for space with local artisan boutiques, the meat market selling the catch from Nuuk’s vast fjord-lands, and the stunning Katuaq Cultural Centre, where blockbuster movies, as well as local and foreign performers entertain the people of Nuuk. Although Nuuk has long been a melting pot of Danish and Greenlandic ideas, this is a city where Greenland displays its sophistication, with the Country’s only traffic lights, roundabouts and University. Most of all, expect to find a multitude of friendly people who are proud of who they are, and equally proud of the city they call home.

Arrive
13:30
Depart
Day 126
18th May 2025
Nuuk

In the bustling capital city of Greenland, you could be forgive...

In the bustling capital city of Greenland, you could be forgiven for forgetting you are in such a vast and isolated country. Nuuk is Greenland’s economic and social hub, home to more than a third of Greenland’s population, and although it feels like a world capital, scratch the surface, and a uniquely Greenlandic character can be found underneath. Nuuk Cathedral overlooks the gorgeous old Colonial Harbour district and the Greenland National Museum, resting place of the legendary Qilakitsoq mummies, the true highlight of the museum’s archaeological collection. View less

Above the Colonial Harbour sits downtown Nuuk, with lines of Scandistyle apartments, a bustling shopping district, the Greenlandic Parliament, Nuuk City Hall (which welcomes visitors to see its artwork) and even outdoor cafes selling locally produced food and beer. These nods to modernity compete for space with local artisan boutiques, the meat market selling the catch from Nuuk’s vast fjord-lands, and the stunning Katuaq Cultural Centre, where blockbuster movies, as well as local and foreign performers entertain the people of Nuuk. Although Nuuk has long been a melting pot of Danish and Greenlandic ideas, this is a city where Greenland displays its sophistication, with the Country’s only traffic lights, roundabouts and University. Most of all, expect to find a multitude of friendly people who are proud of who they are, and equally proud of the city they call home.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 129
21st May 2025
St John's, Newfoundland, Canada

Colourful, white-trimmed buildings splash a haze of bright...

Colourful, white-trimmed buildings splash a haze of bright-beauty across the spectacular Newfoundland coastline of St John’s. Picturesque, steep streets roll down to the seafront, and the charming architecture contrasts beautifully against the wild and rugged shoreline, with redolent pine forests spreading out behind. The province’s capital, St John’s, is a lively outpost – and one of North America’s oldest and most historically engaging places. View less

A rich trading history of haggling and hawking has played out on these animated, historic streets – especially Water Street, which is one of North America’s oldest. St John’s boasts incredible history, as the launch point for daring transatlantic voyages and a leap of human ingenuity is celebrated on Signal Hill. It was here where the first transatlantic transmission was received in 1901. Rise up to receive stunning views of the Atlantic, and the city spreading around the harbour from the fortified Cabot Tower. Rugged hiking trails and puffin-nesting cliffs add extra character to this remarkable island. The twin bell towers of the Basilica of St John the Baptist are a St John’s landmark and a National Historic Site dedicated to the city’s namesake saint. The Quidi Vidi fishing village is an arresting stop, inhabited by busy artisans and local craft brewers – who produce characterful beers befitting this exuberant city of bold colours. George Street is the perfect spot to try a glass or two – the street is said to have the most bars per person of anywhere in Canada.

Arrive
13:00
Depart
Day 130
22nd May 2025
St John's, Newfoundland, Canada

Colourful, white-trimmed buildings splash a haze of bright-...

Colourful, white-trimmed buildings splash a haze of bright-beauty across the spectacular Newfoundland coastline of St John’s. Picturesque, steep streets roll down to the seafront, and the charming architecture contrasts beautifully against the wild and rugged shoreline, with redolent pine forests spreading out behind. The province’s capital, St John’s, is a lively outpost – and one of North America’s oldest and most historically engaging places. View less

A rich trading history of haggling and hawking has played out on these animated, historic streets – especially Water Street, which is one of North America’s oldest. St John’s boasts incredible history, as the launch point for daring transatlantic voyages and a leap of human ingenuity is celebrated on Signal Hill. It was here where the first transatlantic transmission was received in 1901. Rise up to receive stunning views of the Atlantic, and the city spreading around the harbour from the fortified Cabot Tower. Rugged hiking trails and puffin-nesting cliffs add extra character to this remarkable island. The twin bell towers of the Basilica of St John the Baptist are a St John’s landmark and a National Historic Site dedicated to the city’s namesake saint. The Quidi Vidi fishing village is an arresting stop, inhabited by busy artisans and local craft brewers – who produce characterful beers befitting this exuberant city of bold colours. George Street is the perfect spot to try a glass or two – the street is said to have the most bars per person of anywhere in Canada.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 132
24th May 2025
Halifax

A city that thrives on a diet of music, outdoor even...

A city that thrives on a diet of music, outdoor events and ocean-faring history, Nova Scotia’s capital – and Atlantic Canada’s largest conurbation – oozes salt-licked charm. The star-shaped fortress of Halifax Citadel sits above the city, while down below, Halifax revolves around its bustling harbour. Here, jet-skis skid across the water and heritage ships jaunt out to scenic offshore islands. Music carries on the waterfront’s breeze as summer’s events play out, while a hefty population of pubs and restaurants provides all the space required for sitting back and relaxing. View less

The shorefront boardwalk invites you on a gentle stroll along the waves, wandering back through Halifax’s history. The Canadian Museum of Immigration waits at Pier 21 and was the doorway to a country of opportunity for so many – with over a million immigrants taking their first footsteps into Canada here. The pier’s wooden boards are dotted with cafes, craft shops and artist studios. Sail deeper into seafaring heritage at the maritime museum. As the closest city to the sinking of the Titanic, recovered victims were transported to – and many were buried – in Halifax. The story, and items from the doomed vessel, are displayed in the museum’s collection. Peggy’s Cove lighthouse is nearby, and this immaculate little lighthouse is one of Canada’s favourite, watching out stoically over the Atlantic’s waves. With rich pickings available from its coastal location, the fruits of the sea are served up in the fryers of Halifax’s varied restaurants – try seared scallops and juicy mussels. Round off any meal with a buttery blueberry grunt dessert – delicious when served up warm with a dollop of melting vanilla ice cream.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 134
26th May 2025
Boston, Massachusetts

Historic yet revolutionary, few places embody the...

Historic yet revolutionary, few places embody the American dream quite as well as Boston – and you’ll feel the strong independent streak, and pride in the founding ideals of freedom and independence wherever you go. Skyscrapers mingle harmoniously with cobbled streets, and every footstep here promises new tales of legend, daring and valour, as you walk through the pages of history and immerse yourself in the stories of one of the USA’s oldest cities.

The flashing colours of Fall – a period when the foliage around Boston explodes with blazes of red, orange and purple – attract visitors from across the world, more than compensating for the northerly city’s harsh winters. Green open spaces like Boston Public Garden also decorate the city, offering breathing space, and the chance to enjoy blossom-perfumed sanctuary,as you sit among scampering squirrels and quiet boating lakes. At times, Boston feels like an open-air history museum, and the Freedom Trail links together the city’s many valuable historic sites. It’s no exaggeration to say that the world’s history pivoted significantly on this humble two-and-a-half-mile trail. Wander across incendiary sites like the Boston Massacre Site, and Bunker Hill – where the first shots of the American Revolutionary War were fired, eventually leading to independence from British rule. Fenway Park is the cathedral-like home of Boston’s famous Red Sox, and a must visit for any sports fan. You’ll also find plenty of acclaimed New England seafood to sample, including famous buttery clam chowder. Restaurants in the thriving Seaport District serve up freshly harvested crab and lobster, accompanied by spectacular views of the crashing Atlantic waves.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
Day 135
27th May 2025
Boston, Massachusetts

Historic yet revolutionary, few places embody the Ame...

Historic yet revolutionary, few places embody the American dream quite as well as Boston – and you’ll feel the strong independent streak, and pride in the founding ideals of freedom and independence wherever you go. Skyscrapers mingle harmoniously with cobbled streets, and every footstep here promises new tales of legend, daring and valour, as you walk through the pages of history and immerse yourself in the stories of one of the USA’s oldest cities.

The flashing colours of Fall – a period when the foliage around Boston explodes with blazes of red, orange and purple – attract visitors from across the world, more than compensating for the northerly city’s harsh winters. Green open spaces like Boston Public Garden also decorate the city, offering breathing space, and the chance to enjoy blossom-perfumed sanctuary,as you sit among scampering squirrels and quiet boating lakes. At times, Boston feels like an open-air history museum, and the Freedom Trail links together the city’s many valuable historic sites. It’s no exaggeration to say that the world’s history pivoted significantly on this humble two-and-a-half-mile trail. Wander across incendiary sites like the Boston Massacre Site, and Bunker Hill – where the first shots of the American Revolutionary War were fired, eventually leading to independence from British rule. Fenway Park is the cathedral-like home of Boston’s famous Red Sox, and a must visit for any sports fan. You’ll also find plenty of acclaimed New England seafood to sample, including famous buttery clam chowder. Restaurants in the thriving Seaport District serve up freshly harvested crab and lobster, accompanied by spectacular views of the crashing Atlantic waves.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 137
29th May 2025
New York City

The city comprises the central island of Manhattan along wi...

The city comprises the central island of Manhattan along with four other boroughs: Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island. To many, Manhattan is New York. The 22-square-mile island is divided into the three districts of Downtown, Midtown and Upper Manhattan. There are countless museums, theaters, restaurants and parks. Many residents never get to see it all in a lifetime, so don’t expect to take it all in during one visit.

Arrive
07:00
Depart

YOUR SHIP - The Silver Dawn

A new world of luxury is waiting aboard Silver Dawn. Both classic yet modern, Silver Dawn is the natural evolution of our fleet. Large enough to offer eight dining options – including the superb Sea and Land Taste (S.A.L.T.) programme – yet small enough for the famed Silversea on board ambience, Silver Dawn inherits the best features of her sister ships Silver Muse and Silver Moon, but is in a class all of her own. Sumptuous suites, outstanding itineraries plus cutting-edge design and technology, Silver Dawn sets new standards of luxury. Let’s wake up to a new dawn with Silversea.

Description

A new world of luxury is waiting aboard Silver Dawn. Both classic yet modern, Silver Dawn is the natural evolution of our fleet. Large enough to offer eight dining options – including the superb Sea and Land Taste (S.A.L.T.) programme – yet small enough for the famed Silversea on board ambience, Silver Dawn inherits the best features of her sister ships Silver Muse and Silver Moon, but is in a class all of her own. Sumptuous suites, outstanding itineraries plus cutting-edge design and technology, Silver Dawn sets new standards of luxury. Let’s wake up to a new dawn with Silversea.

STATEROOMS

    suite

    Comfortable, spacious and offering stupendous ocean views, the Vista Suite carries its name very well! Wake up to wide ocean views, breakfast to the sound of the waves lapping at the side of the ship or simply relax with the in-suite entertainment system and comfy sofas. Some Vista Suites are a little larger than standard – perfect for our guests with limited mobility. If you have ever wanted a home away from home on the high seas, the vista Suite is it. Sitting Area. Twin beds or queen-sized bed. Marble bathroom with vanity, full-sized bath, separate shower. Wheelchair accessible suite has a marble bathroom with vanity and separate shower (no full-sized bath). Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe; wheelchair accessible suites fitted with cupboards and wardrobe with personal safe. Writing desk. One 40” / 102 cm flat-screen HD TV. Interactive Media Library. Unlimited Standard Wifi.
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