42-Day South Pacific Islands & New Zealand Collect

  • Inside price from
    $12,539*/pp
  • Outside price from
    $13,599*/pp
  • Balcony price from
    $18,249*/pp
  • Suite price from
    $23,649*/pp

YOUR ITINERARY

Sydney, Australia - Queensland - Brisbane - Townsville - Cairns - Alotau - Conflict Islands - Kiriwina Island - Honiara - Luganville - Port Vila - Mystery Island - Lautoka - Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands - Dravuni Island - Vava 'u - Nuku'alofa - Waitangi (Bay of Islands) - Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand - Auckland, New Zealand - Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand - Napier - Wellington, New Zealand - Timaru - Dunedin, New Zealand - Cruising Fiordland National Park - Hobart - Burnie - Melbourne - Sydney, Australia

Date
Port
Info
Arrive
Depart
Day 1
4th Jan 2026
Sydney, Australia

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal, lo...

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers’ wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too.

The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city’s best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café.

Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you’ll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia’s cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

Arrive
Depart
18:00
Day 3
6th Jan 2026
Queensland

From the deck of your ship or from your private v...

From the deck of your ship or from your private verandah, watch the sunset over Sherrard Island, part of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Lying between Torres Strait and Cairns, an overnight stay anchored off Sherrard Island is available on select Australia cruise itineraries.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 4
7th Jan 2026
Brisbane

Queensland’s capital, tucked between the Go...

Queensland’s capital, tucked between the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast, is often overlooked in favor of its stylish sister, Sydney, and its cultured cousin, Melbourne. But Brisbane, or “Brissy” for short, has recently come out of the shadows to show off its own variety of sun-drenched cool. Brisbane may be a contender for Australia’s hippest city, thanks to its clutch of crafty bars, eclectic restaurants and homegrown fashion. The city’s subtropical climate brings joggers and cyclists to the banks of the Brisbane River year round; jacarandas and frangipani bloom in the spring. This is one of the country’s fastest-expanding areas in terms of population and employment: People flock here for the affordable lifestyle, the booming economy and the laid-back attitude. When newcomers arrive, creativity follows, as evidenced by the museums and theaters of South Bank and the revived districts such as Fortitude Valley. Fortitude is a good word for Brisbane—a hardworking city on its way to fame and fortune.

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Arrive
08:00
Depart
16:00
Day 6
9th Jan 2026
Townsville

The Townsville region in North Queensland, Australia is a bustli...

The Townsville region in North Queensland, Australia is a bustling and vibrant destination boasting diversity in landscape, lifestyle and experiences. Experience barra fishing in the Burdekin or Hinchinbrook, snorkeling fringing reefs around Magnetic Island, scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef, bird watching at the surrounding wetlands, skydiving The Strand in Townsville, or taking a wagon ride in Charters Towers. With reef, rainforest, outback and wetlands all within easy traveling distance of Townsville, Australia’s spectacular natural wonders await your exploration.
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Arrive
10:00
Depart
19:00
Day 7
10th Jan 2026
Cairns

The gateway to Australia’s Great Barrier Ree...

The gateway to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and the tropical north of the country, Cairns sits on the east coast of the Cape York Peninsula in northern Queensland. This laid-back city is popular with travelers who depart from here for days of sailing, diving, snorkeling and trekking through nearby parks—a celebrated launching pad especially for those who want to explore the reef, the Daintree Rain Forest and other attractions of this part of Queensland. And what better place to start one’s adventure? The residents of Cairns are welcoming, the beach life fantastic and the climate consistently sunny and warm.

Wend your way due east of Cairns, and you’ll find yourself on the Great Barrier Reef, the world’s longest coral reef and also the world’s largest living organism. Famously visible from outer space, it’s often been described as one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Kuranda Scenic Railway is a different sort of wonder—an engineering marvel from the 19th century that passes through rain forests on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites before reaching the village of Kuranda. Green Island, a 6,000-year-old coral cay, is an easy day trip from Cairns with opportunities to snorkel and swim; Port Douglas, an hour north of Cairns, is a favorite with visitors thanks to its top-notch restaurants, art galleries and boutiques. Finally, hop on a six-person cable car known as the Skyway Rainforest Cableway for a bird’s-eye view of the stunning natural appeal of the region.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 9
12th Jan 2026
Alotau

The sprawling town of Alotau, spectacularly located...

The sprawling town of Alotau, spectacularly located on Papua New Guinea’s southeastern tip, is an ideal introduction to the relaxed charms of the region. The capital of Milne Bay Province, Alotau is also the main port for the 600 islands that encompass the area.

The buzzing harbor, just a short walk from town, is a hive of activity, with ships, boats and canoes transporting passengers and plying their trades.The town was the site of the 1942 Battle of Milne Bay, resulting in Japan’s first defeat in the Pacific during World War II. Milne Bay was a major Allied base, and some of the war’s fiercest fighting took place in Papua New Guinea. Although there’s not much to see now, a fascinating Battle of Milne Bay tour combines historic war stories with locals’ tales of how modern warfare changed their world.

More broadly, Alotau is an excellent place to gain insight into Papua New Guinea’s cultures and traditions; don’t miss the Cultural Festival excursion in which you’ll see everything from warrior dances to gospel choirs to traditional drumming. For even more local flavor, wander through Alotau Market with its mounds of betel nuts, which many islanders chew.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 10
13th Jan 2026
Conflict Islands

Papua New Guinea is quickly becoming a favorite des...

Papua New Guinea is quickly becoming a favorite destination for cruise passengers, and it’s easy to see why when you visit the Conflict Islands. Although the name might not sound inviting (don’t worry, they’re named after a British naval ship, not a war), these 21 islands are like paradise on earth: Tropical islets encircle an enormous turquoise lagoon formed by the rim of a sunken volcano, with vibrant coral reefs and rainbow schools of fish below the water. Located about 160 kilometers (97 miles) east of Papua New Guinea in the Coral Sea, the island group is owned by Australian businessman and conservationist Ian Gowrie-Smith, who is dedicated to protecting the ecosystem of the islands (he has an eco-resort on one island; the rest are uninhabited).Just as Papua New Guinea is one of the wildest and most diverse places on the planet, the seas here offer some of the world’s most extensive biodiversity and coral reefs, making for unparalleled kayaking, diving and snorkeling. There are hundreds of coral species and thousands of species of fish and invertebrates such as the sea cucumber. If you ever get bored with watching manta rays float past, lie back on the white sand, look up at the palm trees blowing in warm trade winds or watch the sun set over the lagoon, and dream of owning your own chain of tropical islands.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 11
14th Jan 2026
Kiriwina Island

Located in Papua New Guinea’s Milne Bay Province,...

Located in Papua New Guinea’s Milne Bay Province, Kiriwina is the largest of the Trobriand Islands and home to the majority of their 12,000-strong indigenous population. The picturesque island is steeped in history and is famous to many as a site of U.S. occupation during World War II. In fact, various relics of the war, including the remains of an American plane, can still be seen on the island. But Kiriwina is home to far more than history. Here, you’ll find an idyllic traditional lifestyle, incredibly friendly locals and a fascinating social structure that’s based on matrilineal clans, with unique marriage and courtship rituals. Many aspects of life revolve around the cultivation and exchange of yams.There’s also mesmerizing scenery, from crystal-clear waters to jungle-covered cliffs. Hire a dugout canoe, hike to the burial caves, peruse exquisite carvings and explore the coral-filled offshore islands. Be sure to stop and watch a game of Trobriand cricket, an innovative spin on the game. Whatever you choose to do, it’s bound to be an eye-opening experience.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 13
16th Jan 2026
Honiara

Honiara offers tourists a number of attractions, ...

Honiara offers tourists a number of attractions, including the National Museum, the Melanesian Cultural Center, the Honiara and Kukum markets, the National Parliament Building, and World War II war zones and museums. Outside the capital, the island is a paradise for nature and bird watchers and an excellent dive site. There are also a number of beautiful beaches to discover.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 15
18th Jan 2026
Luganville

Located on Espiritu Santo Island, Luganville played an importan...

Located on Espiritu Santo Island, Luganville played an important role during World War II, providing a secure base for up to 100,000 US soldiers in 1942. Today, the island offers peaceful explorations of secluded beaches, small villages, and tropical forests. Explore the areas WWII relics; enjoy snorkeling or diving on pristine coral reefs; and soak up the local atmosphere at the busy Luganville Market, where villagers sell their fresh produce and colorful handcrafts.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 16
19th Jan 2026
Port Vila

Situated on the island of Efate, Port Vila is the capital...

Situated on the island of Efate, Port Vila is the capital city of Vanuatu. This South Pacific paradise is everything you would imagine and more. Enter the magical and mysterious world of ancient Melanesia at Ekasup Cultural Village; swim in rock pools within the cascading waterfalls of a rainforest jungle; and visit Mele Gardens – showcasing Vanuatu’s magnificent flora. Sample shore excursions: Paradise Cove Sail & Snorkel; A Taste of Vila; Village Adventure: Around the Island.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 17
20th Jan 2026
Mystery Island

Offering an alluring blend of nature and tranquility, the small...

Offering an alluring blend of nature and tranquility, the small island of Anatom (aka Aneityum) is one of the South Pacific’s lesser-known but dependable tropical hotspots. The southernmost island of Vanuatu, its diminutive size (159 square kilometers, or 61 square miles) and lack of modern amenities—there’s no Internet nor even running water or electricity—lends the place something of a Robinson Crusoe-esque atmosphere. Although it’s possible to walk around the entire island in less than an hour, there is much to explore in a day trip. As well as taking advantage of the many soft, sandy beaches and the sparkling azure waters and coral reefs, it’s possible to hike the many trails that crisscross the island’s sandalwood-studded and mountainous interior. In addition, you can visit the village of Anelghowhat (or Anelcauhat) on the south side of the island, which has discarded whaling-industry equipment, former irrigation channels and the ruins of missionary John Geddie’s church. It’s also possible to visit picturesque Port Patrick, climb to the top of the extinct volcano Inrerow Atahein, or Inrerow Atamein (853 meters, or 2,800 feet), and admire various waterfalls dotted around the island, such as the impressive Inwan Leleghei. Off the shore of Anatom is the unpopulated Mystery Island, where cruise ship tenders moor and passengers get to spend some quality beach time on a deserted island paradise. Islanders from Anatom paddle out to meet the visitors and set up temporary shops near the dock, where they grill fish and sell a few snacks and souvenirs.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 19
22nd Jan 2026
Lautoka

Welcome to paradise – white sand, clear turquoise...

Welcome to paradise – white sand, clear turquoise waters and 50 luxuriant acres of orchids at the late Raymond Burr’ s Garden of the Sleeping Giant. Sample shore excursions: Nausori Highland Village; Nadi Hinterland & the Garden of the Sleeping Giant; Shotover Jet Boat & Shopping.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 20
23rd Jan 2026
Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands

In the time before time, the people who would become the...

In the time before time, the people who would become the Fijians were shaped of wet earth, pulled from the sea on a giant fishhook and given more than 300 islands to live on. Or if you want to be a little more prosaic, the people of Fiji were part of the great Lapita migration, which began somewhere around Taiwan and headed east. The first boats to arrive stopped migrating when they found this maze of islands formed by the earth turning itself inside out with volcanoes.

The new Fijians spent a couple centuries involved in internecine war and developed the bad habit of using clubs to bop all strangers. But strangers kept showing up for the simple reason that Fiji, especially the southeast coast of Viti Levu, was geographically wonderful: the kind of spot that made mariners chuck their anchors and start trying to make a living as a settler. And who knows, maybe the Fijians just had tired arms, but by the time missionaries came, powers had shifted and the bopping had stopped.

Today that southeast corner of the largest island in Fiji, the city of Suva, holds three-quarters of the nation’s population. It’s also shielded by shimmering green mountains opening to a calm sea, a land lush with afternoon rains.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
23:00
Day 21
24th Jan 2026
Dravuni Island

During the great age of exploration, when sailors were po...

During the great age of exploration, when sailors were poking into every unknown corner of the globe, nobody went to the islands of Fiji, including Dravuni, some 65 kilometers (40 miles) to the south of the main island of Fiji. Ships would sail up far enough to see perfect beaches, blue-hole reefs and mountains big enough to be called mountains, but not so big you’d kill yourself hauling a cannon up one.

But then the Fijians would appear. Enormous people, faces tattooed in intricate designs, each carrying that one essential of Fijian life: a dark wooden club studded with shark teeth. The cannibal’s best friend.

Most of the stories of head-hunting and cannibalism were set in Fiji, where the greatest honors were given to those who brought home the most enemy heads. Since the residents of the archipelago’s 300 islands had been warring with each other for centuries, they saw in the arrival of representatives of the outside world an exciting (and potentially tasty) development.

But all things must pass, even cannibal rituals. Life on Fiji changed and these days, Fijians still come down to meet ships and they still carry war clubs, but instead of looking for lunch, they’re looking to yell “Bula!” in greeting to as many people as the day allows.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 23
26th Jan 2026
Vava 'u

The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of th...

The Vava’u (va-vuh-OO) island group is part of the Kingdom of Tonga—an even larger collection of tropical Pacific Ocean islands. With an ideal year-round climate that’s perfect for swimming, snorkeling, diving and sailing, the islands—which are mostly uninhabited—boast a varied set of attractions for visitors that only begin with their famed white-sand beaches lapped by turquoise waters (with visibility down to 30 meters, or 100 feet) and enchanting coral reefs teeming with abundant marine life like tropical fish, dolphins and sea turtles. In addition to these simple but highly memorable watery pleasures, the Vava’u islands offer tropical forests, limestone cliffs and caves to explore, traditional villages to check out and a wealth of activities ranging from sea kayaking and gamefishing to yachting. Not only can you spot humpback whales (between July and October) and take in the unique atmosphere of historic cemeteries, you can also enjoy a hike up Mount Talau. The island’s tourism infrastructure extends to boutique resorts and ecolodges, as well as plenty of cafés and restaurants, particularly in the main city of Neiafu.
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Featur

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 24
27th Jan 2026
Nuku'alofa

Unique in many ways, Tonga is the only country in the South ...

Unique in many ways, Tonga is the only country in the South Pacific that has never been colonized. The secret to this tiny kingdom’s lasting autonomy lies with its monarchy – rich in culture and tradition; unafraid to modernize and move forward. You’ll find Nuku’alofa on the isle of Tongatapu – the largest of the 171 island jewels in the Tongan crown. Hopefully the Tongan people, cheerful and welcoming, will treat you to a version of the lakalaka – their compelling art of storytelling manifested in a breathtaking dance.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 27
30th Jan 2026
Waitangi (Bay of Islands)

Historic sites—including the place where the mo...

Historic sites—including the place where the most important treaty in New Zealand’s history was signed—winemaking, golfing, sailing and scenic beauty all combine to make the Bay of Islands one of this South Pacific nation’s most compelling regions. Located at the top of the North Island, the area has a subtropical microclimate that gives it an abundance of flora and fauna and a lengthy beach season. Comprising 144 islands between Cape Brett and the Purerua Peninsula, the Bay of Islands requires a few days to fully explore. Visitors with just a day here will have to make a tough choice: cultural immersion, nature appreciation or wining-dining-shopping. Waitangi, home to both the cruise port and the region’s historic treaty grounds, is one of three main towns with celebrated sights. The others are Kerikeri, with its historic buildings and vineyards, and Russell, where a notorious seafaring past has mellowed into tidy, day-trip-worthy charm. Those who’d rather experience the Bay of Islands’ breathtaking nature can walk amid majestic kauri trees, descend into glowworm caves or spy on whales and dolphins (or even swim with the latter) in one of New Zealand’s sunniest and most picturesque playgrounds.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
16:00
Day 28
31st Jan 2026
Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand

Site of fierce Maori wars, Tauranga today is a peace...

Site of fierce Maori wars, Tauranga today is a peaceful city in the heart of kiwifruit-growing country. Farther afield: Rotorua, with its spouting geysers and bubbling mud pools, the Waitomo Glow Worm Caves and nocturnal kiwi houses. Sample shore excursions: Fascinating Rotorua; Longridge Park & Jetboat Ride; Maori Marae Visit.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
18:00
Day 29
1st Feb 2026
Auckland, New Zealand

New Zealand’s biggest city deserves more than...

New Zealand’s biggest city deserves more than a layover. Auckland is multicultural and cosmopolitan, with sizeable Polynesian, Asian and Maori populations enriching its history and broadening the palate. Internationally known chefs and fashion designers have made neighborhoods like Ponsonby, Newmarket and Parnell world-class destinations for shopping and dining.

You’re never far from water attractions in New Zealand—and this is especially true in Auckland where it’s not unheard of for downtown workers to go kayaking on their lunch break. The once-gritty port has been transformed into inviting public spaces and buzzing nightclubs, with sailboat charters and regular ferry connections waiting to whisk visitors around the harbor for sightseeing.

Start your day sipping a flat white while you plan your explorations: art gallery crawl, winery tour or volcano hike? It’s possible to do all three without losing sight of the Sky Tower, one of Auckland’s top tourist attractions, from which you can get a bird’s-eye view of the gateway to Aotearoa.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
17:00
Day 30
2nd Feb 2026
Tauranga (Rotorua), New Zealand

Site of fierce Maori wars, Tauranga today is a peace...

Site of fierce Maori wars, Tauranga today is a peaceful city in the heart of kiwifruit-growing country. Farther afield: Rotorua, with its spouting geysers and bubbling mud pools, the Waitomo Glow Worm Caves and nocturnal kiwi houses. Sample shore excursions: Fascinating Rotorua; Longridge Park & Jetboat Ride; Maori Marae Visit.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 31
3rd Feb 2026
Napier

A city of vision, rebuilt in the striking, clean st...

A city of vision, rebuilt in the striking, clean style of art deco after a devastating earthquake in 1931 and reinvented as a center for gourmet food and wines. Sample shore excursions: Napier Art Deco Highlights; Cape Kidnappers Gannet Safari; Hawke’s Bay Wineries; A Taste of New Zealand:: Epicurean Experience at Sileni Estates.

Arrive
12:01
Depart
18:00
Day 32
4th Feb 2026
Wellington, New Zealand

New Zealand’s friendly capital city features gaily pain...

New Zealand’s friendly capital city features gaily painted old wooden houses and a red cable car that takes you up to the Wellington Botanic Gardens and a fine view of the harbor. A must-see is the engaging Te Papa Museum. Sample shore excursions: The Best of Wellington’s Pubs; Boomrock Escape; Lord of the Rings – on Location.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
18:00
Day 33
5th Feb 2026
Timaru

Strolling along the city’s hilly streets and p...

Strolling along the city’s hilly streets and past its Edwardian and Victorian buildings and green spaces, you might not guess that Timaru was built on the lava flows of a now-extinct but vividly named volcano, Mount Horrible. Timaru’s own name comes from the Maori Te Maru, which means \”place of shelter.\” Chief among Timaru’s charms are its parks and gardens. As if the backdrop of the Southern Alps wasn’t enough, a rose garden, boardwalk and beach also enliven the already beautiful waterfront of Caroline Bay, named for a 19th-century whaling ship. Up the hill, the scenic reserve of Centennial Park offers picturesque picnic spots and walking and biking trails. Timaru showcases New Zealand and Maori culture at the stellar Aigantighe Art Gallery and South Canterbury Museum. (If you have time to venture beyond Timaru and are interested in learning about the area’s truly ancient history, the fascinating Te Ana Maori Rock Art Centre, about half an hour outside the city, exhibits rock art made by early Maori settlers more than 700 years ago.)

Arrive
11:00
Depart
19:00
Day 34
6th Feb 2026
Dunedin, New Zealand

Much of New Zealand feels like England, by way of Po...

Much of New Zealand feels like England, by way of Polynesia. There are a few exceptions, though, such as the town of Akaroa, a former French settlement, and the distinctly Scottish city of Dunedin, named after the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh. After Dunedin was founded in 1848, city surveyor Charles Kettle attempted to impose Edinburgh’s New Town grid plan on the growing city. But the Otago Peninsula’s hilly landscape proved challenging—for evidence, note that Dunedin has one of the world’s steepest streets (Baldwin Street). The volcanic remnants around the harbor make for a dramatic backdrop.
Dunedin’s prominence during the gold rush in the late 19th century resulted in many grand Victorian and Edwardian buildings. Thanks to the beautiful University of Otago (the country’s oldest), there’s a large student population to keep the city vibrant and modern. But Dunedin’s heritage is always proudly on display: The magnificent Dunedin Railway Station and Larnach Castle have been restored to their full glory, and the fascinating Toitu Otago Settlers Museum provides a glimpse into the lives of early residents. Outside the city, the Otago Peninsula is lined with scenic beaches and home to rare birdlife like the royal albatross and yellow-eyed penguin.

Arrive
07:00
Depart
18:00
Day 35
7th Feb 2026
Cruising Fiordland National Park

Every year, visitors flock to New Zealand in search of la...

Every year, visitors flock to New Zealand in search of landscapes straight out of Middle Earth. They find what they’re looking for in Fiordland National Park, on the southwestern coast of the South Island. This stunning 12,000-square-kilometer (4,633-square-mile) park encompasses mountains, lakes, fjords and rain forests. The area was once the home of Maori hunters; later, European whalers established small settlements here. But mostly, this region has seen a notable lack of human activity—the steep peaks and wet landscape deterred all but the hardiest people. That changed around the end of the 19th century, when travelers discovered the beautiful scenery of Fiordland. The national park was formally established in 1952.

Countless plant and animal species find a haven here. Among the park’s rare birds is the flightless takahe, thought for decades to be extinct until it was spotted in the area in 1948. The natural wonders continue offshore: Seals, dolphins and whales frequent these waters.

Arrive
Depart
Day 38
10th Feb 2026
Hobart

Tasmania, once the butt of many jokes, is finally c...

Tasmania, once the butt of many jokes, is finally cool. The little Australian island is home to stunning landscapes, old-growth forests and exceptional local produce. Lording over all this goodness is Hobart, the island’s creative capital. Although its remoteness might once have made it feel provincial, the city has truly come into its own in recent years. It’s got one of the world’s best museums of contemporary art, vibrant markets, a cosmopolitan dining scene and eclectic music festivals. It’s also achingly beautiful, with a natural harbor setting and rugged Mount Wellington looming in the background.

The city is compact enough to easily explore on foot. Start at the sandstone area of Salamanca Place with its hip galleries, artist studios and bustling cafés and bars, and then roam the quaint streets of Battery Point, one of Hobart’s oldest neighborhoods. Immerse yourself in nature at the gorgeous Botanical Gardens or head out of town to learn more about Tasmania’s dark—but fascinating—past. Fuel up on the freshest seafood straight from the Southern Ocean down at the waterfront, or feast on gourmet Tassie produce at one of the many excellent restaurants in town. Whatever you choose to do, we promise you won’t be bored.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 40
12th Feb 2026
Burnie

Burnie’s long-running logging industry is just ...

Burnie’s long-running logging industry is just one hint at the amazing forests that surround the town, from the UNESCO World Heritage area that contains Tasmania’s most famous crag—Cradle Mountain—to the lesser-known rain forests of the Tarkine wilderness. Woodworkers, papermakers and print artists thrive in this misty land of trees, as does rare wildlife, ranging from wedge-tailed eagles to echidnas and the fabled Tasmanian devils. There’s pristine beachfront, too, where little penguins march and well-to-do locals dine on seafood platters as they gaze off into Bass Strait. Tasmania’s separation from mainland Australia has created a resourceful, self-reliant and sometimes rebellious community that cooks and farms as well as it crafts and explores. Burnie’s bounty includes award-winning single-malt whiskeys, hard apple cider, trout and salmon, hormone-free milk and cheeses and beef from Cape Grim in the far northwest. Known for having the world’s cleanest air, Burnie is an exciting base for a taste tour as well as a rugged or refined adventure.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 41
13th Feb 2026
Melbourne

Melbourne is consistently voted one of the world’s ...

Melbourne is consistently voted one of the world’s most livable cities—and for good reason. This is Australia’s cosmopolitan heart with cutting-edge art and architecture, historic galleries, attractions and museums, plus a dizzying range of restaurants, bistros, markets and bars. It’s renowned for its sporting culture, home to the esteemed Melbourne Cricket Ground and Australian rules football teams.

The famous laneways of Melbourne bustle with hidden bars and eateries, while myriad beaches and parks allow for the ultimate outdoor lifestyle and active things to do. It’s a melting pot of cultures and a city of gourmands who demand excellent food and find it everywhere—from modern Australian cuisine and delicious Asian fusion fare to low-key cafés serving the best coffee you’ve ever tasted.

If you want to leave the city, Melbourne is the gateway to Victoria’s world-class wineries and spectacular coastline sights. Visit the famous penguins at nearby Phillip Island or feast on local produce in the picture-perfect Yarra Valley. Wherever you go in and around Melbourne, you’ll be sure to understand why so many choose to call this beautiful corner of the world home.

Arrive
08:00
Depart
17:00
Day 43
15th Feb 2026
Sydney, Australia

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal,...

If you want a snapshot of Australia’s appeal, look no further than Sydney: The idyllic lifestyle, friendly locals and drop-dead natural beauty of this approachable metropolis and its attractions explain why the country tops so many travelers’ wish lists. But Sydney is more than just the embodiment of classic antipodean cool—the city is in a constant state of evolution. A list of what to do in Sydney might start with the white-hot nightlife, with its new cocktail bars and idiosyncratic mixology dens. Inventive restaurants helmed by high-caliber chefs are dishing up everything from posh pan-Asian to Argentine street food, while the famous dining temples that put Sydney on the gastronomic map are still going strong too.

The famed harbor is among the top sights—home to twin icons the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is the stepping-off point for some of the city’s best cultural attractions and sightseeing. In one day you can sail around the harbor, get a behind-the-scenes tour of the opera house and climb the bridge, with time to spare for people-watching over a flat white at a waterfront café.

Speaking of water, when you plan what to do in Sydney, you will want to include the iconic beaches, where surfers, office workers and tourists alike converge on some of the most gorgeous shoreline scenery anywhere. Bondi, Bronte and Clovelly are all within easy reach of the Central Business District, as is Manly, a charming seaside town located a short ferry ride from Circular Quay. Beyond the city you’ll discover UNESCO World Heritage Sites and the chance to encounter Australia’s cuddliest wildlife—a perfect way to round out your envy-inducing Sydney photo collection.

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YOUR SHIP - The 42-Day South Pacific Islands & New Zealand Collect Noordam 2026-01-04

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